I Share Hope

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Story. Action. Hope.

Stories about hope and ways to share hope

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Fatima Palma

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Fatima with band

Interview

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“Dear people of the world, try to live for others don’t just try to live for yourself… you have all the resources to help out other people, to make their lives better. I am not saying that you help out in a big way, but if you can in little ways because through you the world is able to see that miracles exist. We will never know the extent of the good things that we’re going to be able to be to other people, but then one thing is for sure, they are going to remember you for that good thing that you’ve done. That itself is priceless.” — Fatima Palma

Fatima Palma was recently awarded by the Philippines House of Representatives the first ever resolution given to a Filipino Nurse – A Commendation for a “Rapping Nurse in the Philippines who is able to bring inspiration to colleagues and patients.” Known as the “Nurse Rapper” whose video went viral online getting over 500,000 views and about 100,000 likes on different social media pages.

Miss Palma not only works as a nurse, but as a rap artist, songwriter and vocalist for the hip-hop band TUKAR SINATI. She has been featured in the following shows: 24 ORAS, MUTYA NG MASA, AKSYON, UMAGANG KAY GANDA, SINGING BEE, ASAP and had her life story told on MMK as portrayed by Maxene Magalona.



17: Fatima Palma – Nurse Rapper – Nurse by day, rapper by night, 3 steps of hope – #isharehope

“Dear people of the world, try to live for others don’t just try to live for yourself. So, meaning to say you have all the resources to help out other people to make their lives better. I am not saying that you help out in a big way, but if you can in little ways because through you the world is able to see that miracles exist. We will never know the extent of the good things that we’re going to be able to be to other people, but then one thing is for sure, they are going to remember you for that good thing that you’ve done. That itself is priceless. Hi everyone, I’m Fatima Palma, I’m the nurse rapper and I share hope.” – Fatima Palma

Intro:

Welcome to I Share Hope! The podcast where world leaders share their real stories of hope and how you can use actionable hope to start changing your life today and now here’s your host, Chris Williams.

Chris Williams:

This is great. We have Maria Fatima Palma with us. Maria is a nurse, a very accomplished nurse. She has a lot of education. First, MIS Associate in 2008. In just a second, I want you to tell me more about that one. Staff nurse for the past five years for East Avenue Medical Center, two years of surgical and SICU staff nurse, three years of medical staff nurse, assistant editor in chief of several news publications around the area.

This nurse has a YouTube video out there with over a half a million hits on it. She also has a social media following of over 100,000 people on different platforms and she’s been on five or six, looks like maybe even seven TV shows because she’s a rapper, as in hip hop rapper. She’s very active not only with her band, but she uses rap in her work but really cheering people up, bringing a lot of hope, entertaining people and getting them engaged in a way that you just can’t usually do when you’re a nurse. When I think of nurses, I think of needles and stickers and band aids and not rappers.

Tell me more a little about you. Give me a little background and then I’ll ask the five questions.

Fatima Palma:

Hi everyone, my name is Fatima Palma, I’m 28 years old. I live here in the Philippines. I’ve been a government nurse. I work for the public people of the Philippines. For the past five years, I help out mainly as a nurse and also as a rap artist.

Chris Williams:

So literally, you’re rapping like did you work a shift yesterday or last night?

Fatima Palma:

I worked yesterday, but that one is too toxic. I want to make sure I accomplish both at the same time. I get to finish my job as a nurse and then right after I’m done, that’s when I start rapping to them. When I know the situation is okay.

Chris Williams:

That’s amazing. You’re doing this in clubs and on stages and other venue with your band, right? What’s your band’s name and how many shows do you all do in a month? A year?

Fatima Palma:

We are called Tukar Sinati, so by day I’m a nurse, but then I’m night I’m a hip hop artist. We are called Tukar Sinati. I play in a band and then Tukar is actually Ilonggo, a dialect in the Philippines which means sound and Sinati, experience. Our band is, in English, called Sound Experience. We as a band, we try to promote Philippine culture by putting Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao, the three states of the Philippines all together and using different dialects on our music. Just we can promote that, our cultural and religious differences can work in one music. We perform every time, but mostly on Thursdays and Saturdays. We do that. I’m a club emcee before and so I was a nurse and also at the same time, that was the only thing that got me going because we weren’t really being paid well at the hospital, so I had to work two jobs. Right after I go to the hospital, I go to the club and I emcee there too.

Chris Williams:

Amazing. You’re really amazing and your medical career is really quite accomplished. I love seeing the list of things you’ve done. Okay, this will be a lot of fun because you totally go against the grain in so many ways and I love that. It’s super fun to talk to somebody who’s just way out of the box. I’m going to ask the five questions and we ask the same five questions to every person we interview. They’re about hope and your view of hope. You can answer them any way you want to.

Fatima Palma:

Okay.

Chris Williams:

Question 1: Your definition or favorite quote about hope or your belief about hope. What does hope mean to you?

Fatima Palma:

I think there’s no quote that I could just define myself into. It’s just like more on the experience. I guess hope to me is when you try to be resilient amidst everything that’s happened to you. My life story is actually about that, so technically speaking its how I was able to bounce back. Hope to me, I guess, is when you just don’t give in right away and then the next thing you know something nice happens. I guess that’s the way my life was. My life has been a lot of down points. I almost gave up as a nurse. My life as a nurse was extremely hard especially as a Filipino government nurse. First of all, the difference is we’re not technologically updated, second is we’re compensated very low. If you’re going to ask me the ratio of a nurse against a patient, I hate to say this but it’s 1 against 25. It came to a point, 1 is to 50. Every day, if you would ask me, hope to me was trying to work so hard but then at the end of the day trying to accomplish a lot of things. Aside from that, even if I was losing hope, I was able to give back hope to other people by rapping to them.

So, I guess hope to me was trying to be happy amidst everything that has happened. Also, hope to me is being happy, you try to stay happy amidst whatever is going on. I guess that’s what hope means, finding light eventually when things are getting so dark. I know it might sound cliché but that to me is – when all things are not going your way, you just don’t give up on it, you just move forward, you just move forward and upward and realizing that people actually need you. I guess that’s what hope means to me.

Chris Williams:

That’s a great definition. There’s so many things there you mentioned. Just not giving up, knowing that something else good can be around the corner and you mentioned taking care of other people and giving them hope even when you’re struggling with hope. You’ve touched a lot of categories and I know we’ll clarify more of those as we go, but I love hearing the interviewees like you, the guests say their thoughts and their definition of hope when it’s not necessarily just a quote out of a book. Don’t want to knock that, but it’s real. Thank you.

Question 2 – Who has shared the most hope with you?

Fatima Palma:

It’s my dad. My father is the one who’s always trying to push me. Could you imagine, so I go home, right? I would always go home so tired like really tired from work. Every day I tell my dad, I think Pa I don’t want this job anymore. It’s going to kill me eventually. This is not right anymore. Every time he’s going to go and tell me, no it’s okay. He would always tell me, you have so much more to give. Every time. I was like, no you don’t understand. What if you were in my shoes? You wouldn’t like this job anymore. But, my dad would always keep on telling me, there’s a reason why I’m there. He would tell me, “Anak”, so anak is like daughter. “Anak, you have a reason why you’re there. You always have a reason why you’re there. God put you there for a reason and you don’ want to quit on it because it’s hard. You just don’t give up on something just because it’s hard.” My dad would always tell me, “Let the people see God in you every time you do something. Let them see you.” He would always tell me this, that I am very lucky to be able to help other people.

He would tell me, how many jobs in the world do you know that actually gets paid? Maybe not too much, but you get paid, but then you get to help out other people too. At the back of my head, I said yes and then he goes “Just remember this all the time”. That’s the thing that always kept me going. It’s not how much money I make, he told me, it was always how many lives I’ve touched at the end of the day. Because when we all go past this earth, he goes at me like, are they going to ask you how much money you make? I’m sure no. Then my dad will tell me, I’m sure they’re going to ask you how many lives you’ve touched. I just keep on playing that on my head every time I go on duty because there were days when I totally gave up. I would go to work not feeling happy at all and then I’d go back home and I’d really cry super hard like I’ve never cried before. I felt like I was actually tortured. It was a mental and physical torture because how can one person take that beating? You’re actually mentally stressed, physically stressed just because of the ratio of the patients against nurses and you see people dying every day.

I think if there’s one down point in working for the government is you see people die every day and you try to do your best just to make things work and apparently you’re not God. You’re able to help other people still, but then it just hurts you that you did your best but still you weren’t able to save a person’s life. But then again on the upper end of it, you are able to understand that these people, you were able to help at the end of the day. My dad will say they are very lucky to have been able to experience a nurse like you, just imagine that. Every time that’s the one thing that my dad would tell me. That my life should always be about other people, not just me. Basically, my dad is the one who always pushes me, together with my mom, he would tell me every day that I am lucky. I am lucky because I am not the one who’s sick firs of all and second, I get the chance to help people every day. Not just because it’s my birthday, not just because it’s a holiday.

It’s rare. People want to help other people every day in their own, but they couldn’t just because they’re too busy doing it but if you’re given that chance, you might as well grab it. It’s funny how my parents were actually the ones who told me what course to take. I originally just wanted to take mass communications, but they were like, no just try to be a nurse just because of how nursing was the trend at that time. I was like okay, maybe I should try that. I loved hip hop so much that at the same time even if I was going to school I was emceeing.

Chris Williams:

Question 3 – When is a time in your life when you had to really rely on hope to get you through something hard? Is this where you want to go with that or do you want me to wait for it?

Fatima Palma:

It came to a point where I was assigned to the most toxic ward. Medicine, apparently, is the most toxic ward. We get intubated patients for sometimes a maximum of 14 and we’re only three nurses, could you imagine that? I’m used to seeing a lot of people die. I could even tell. I could tell if they’re about to die. That’s how I’m used to it, but here’s the thing, it was super hard that every time I go home I’d cry. I’d cry myself to sleep, but I would not tell my parents just because I wanted them to feel happy that I’m okay. But at the back of my head it was like, no, please stop. God please let me find another job. This is the breaking point of my hope. Whenever I go there, I ask myself – I cry when I eat. There was this time I cried and I was eating because I missed my dad’s birthday. I was trying to catch up on my dad’s birthday and apparently one of my patients has the same birth date too. That patient was dying. I was trying to tell the relatives, hey daddy could you do this? I call my patients dad and mom. Hey, daddy could you do this? It’s your birthday. I heard it’s your birthday, you have to make it on your birthday. The dad was very cooperative.

What I’m trying to get at is, I was really focused on that patient on trying to live because it’s his birthday. I told him that it was my dad’s birthday too. He was trying to gasp a lot of air and eventually the family was able to celebrate his birthday, thankfully, but at the end of the night at around 11:00 PM, it was my off already, but I had to attend to him. I was off-duty but they were asking, “Ma’am could you do something about my dad? I don’t think he’s doing well”. I had to attend to him an extra hour even if I was off-duty. To cut this long story short, the patient died. I was trying to call my dad to tell him I was going to make it to his birthday and my dad was so expectant of me trying to go there, but then I had this struggling thing – that I had to help that person. But, the patient died and here’s the thing, the patient’s relatives told me that they were so happy because if not for me their dad would not be able to catch his birthday. They were like, it’s because of you because yesterday you told us he was not doing very well, but then you never stopped attending to us even with a lot of patients. You made sure he’d make it for his birthday.

The bad part is, I don’t really feel happy because he died, but I felt that it was genuine because I was able to get him past his birthday. I came back to our house for my dad’s birthday and lo and behold, I haven’t seen any of the food. The party was literally over. I was crying because how many times do I have to miss occasions like this? How many sacrifices should I do just to get somewhere, just to be stable, just to be happy enough?

My dad came down and said, you better eat. We have some leftovers. Just eat. I was like, no. I just don’t really feel like eating and then I started crying. I realized I missed the occasion and I don’t have any gift for you. I was able to help other people, but I was not able to help myself and not even you. That’s how bad I felt. As I kid I always had birthday gifts for my dad even if it was that small. This time, the only thing I was able to give him was my presence. I know that would have been enough, but it only bluntly shows I don’t have enough money to sustain myself or even just to give my dad a small gift, but I had to sacrifice myself for other people.

That was my breaking point because I started questioning myself. How long should I keep doing this? Should I keep on coming home crying and just feeling sad about everything else every time? When will it end? I’m able to help other people, but I’m not able to help myself. How long must I do this? That was my breaking point basically. That day.

Chris Williams:

We all have them and so often it revolves around somebody you love. It really does. I hear that a lot. I’m so sorry, you really are overworked. I think that brings a lot of people – I think you’re depressed. That really sounds like depression. Your dad was sweet to be so understanding, but what a hard time. Has it gotten any better?

Fatima Palma:

Yes it did after that. I was able to actually bounce back right away, right after the depression thing because the next day I still show up for work trying to be happy and all that. I still rap to my patients even if that was the case. It has changed. If you ask me, yes it has changed. Right after the video got viral, people started to treat me right, especially the people in the hospital. Aside from that, I was able to put the hip hop community on a lighter note. Unlike in the States, hip hop there is really well-known, it’s well-respected. Here in the Philippines, it’s slowly trying to get respect but not until that day I did that. They were realizing, yes, hip hop can give hope. It’s not just all about gangsters. It was always that note, that it’s about gangsters, but to me hip hop was always about break dancing, emceeing. It could actually be something else. Even before I was nurse, I used to help kids too in the gasoline stations.

We have kids who sell flowers outside, the street kids. We go to the gasoline station and we help them out. I taught break dancing to those kids when I was younger. Helping other people, to me, was already inevitable because I started out at a young age. I saw it from my father.

Chris Williams:

You’re doing it again. See, you’re already answering question number four. Look at you. You’re doing great. I think it’s fantastic. To catch people up:

Question 4 – How are you sharing hope today? What are you doing in the community, online, locally there, just being nice to your dog or rapping to your patients, how are you sharing hope with somebody else or building hope in your own life?

You’re already talking about it, but keep going.

Fatima Palma:

I started when I was younger, I still help other people. Even if I’m not in the hospital, whenever I go out I try to go to seminars, especially to nurses, and try to tell them what the job really is about. I try to inspire them every day that it’s okay. That even if life is really that hard, you don’t have to give up on it. I try to make them realize the things that I’ve realized. I share them through seminars, so I go there and I put on seminars. Aside from that, I still help people through music. Whenever I get the chance to, I still do things pro bono. I still rap in front of other people, not just in the hospital, but also outside. Whenever I’m needed, I go there and I share it to them. Recently on my birthday, instead of me celebrating it with relatives, I decided on a random note, because I had no intentions of celebrating it anyway, I went to the slums in Quezon City. It’s actually a very secluded area. It’s in an exclusive village and if you get right in it, there’s actually a squatter’s area. I never knew it existed. My dad was like, you better go through that phase and help them out. I was like, okay, for my birthday because I don’t have any birthday celebrations, I decided to buy a huge pot of porridge and then I bought – we call this “turon”. It’s like a spring roll only there’s banana inside. We call that “turon” here in the Philippines.

I got a pot of porridge enough or 150 people and also turon for 150 people. Instead of celebrating my birthday in a restaurant, I decided to go out there on a random basis and just give it to the kids. It’s like a feeding program. I thought that that would actually be enough. That was the first time I felt that I was needed more because I wish I had more. I actually tried to divide the 150 to fit 200, but then 200 wasn’t enough. The lady there was saying “Ma’am that’s not going to be enough. You need 600 or 700”. I was like, okay, nobody told me. If I had only known I would have brought more. I help out people that way and also I go to colleges. I go to colleges and they ask me to give a speech about motivation and team work and hope. I always tell them the value of education whenever I go to colleges and try to be a light in the world. I actually meet children of different cultures and religion, but then I always tell them this, regardless of what culture, raise or religion a person has, that is not an excuse not to help that person because basically you’re also human.

I always tell them at the end of the day, you don’t want to be remembered just because you live a basic life. You know what I’m saying? Every time you do something and you do it really well, you don’t need a big stage. If you want to help out people, help them genuinely because when you do that you’ll realize how many things you are grateful for. What I’m trying to say to these kids is, maybe someday you could be a better person than me. Maybe you could change the world. We could not change the world’s perspective on how to be human, but then you can practice how to be one. One day, you’ll never know, you’ve helped out so many people that one day when you need help they’re going to be the ones to help you. That’s how humanity should work. Even if you don’t have anything, it’s not an excuse not to help because I believe God gave you so many talent, so many things that you just don’t really use, that you have to use not just for popularity’s sake – no.

Just because you want to show them that God exists and wonderful things exist, it’s going to make the world a better place eventually.

Chris Williams:

That’s awesome. I think you’re actually answering question number five. This is great. Just to show how natural you are or how hard you’re trying, you’re really putting an effort to make sure hope is a part of your life and part of the people’s lives around you. Beautiful.

Question 5 – How would you tell me, a person who’s trying to grow in hope personally or share more hope, anybody else who’s listening, no matter what circumstance or what location in the world they’re in, what would you tell them to do next? Give me simple 1, 2 or 3 simple steps of what do I do today? If I want to start growing in hope or sharing hope now, what do I do next?

Fatima Palma:

If you’re going to ask me on a 1,2, 3 basis, I guess first of all you have to be thankful because if you’re not thankful for what you have, you’re never going to appreciate the beauty of life itself. You have to be thankful about everything. Every time that you wake up and even if you feel grumpy, you have to wake up being thankful basically because you’re alive. Second, you have the things that you need, not most of the things that you want, but at least the things that you need. Being grateful – as what they say, gratitude offsets attitude.

Whenever you’re thankful for the things that you have, things become bigger for you. Even the smallest things that you’re thankful for, it becomes a big deal to you just because you understand. Sometimes when you have this really bad day at work, you feel really bad, but then you realize at the back of your head “I’m thankful I’m still alive”. I could’ve been the person who was sick, I could’ve been the person who had an accident today, but look at me, I’m alive. When you’re thankful, the smallest things become the biggest of a deal. Number two, if you ask me, stay happy. Find things that make you happy. I, for one, always found rapping to be a happy part in my life that I had to share literally to my patients. Every time I rap to my patients I would never ask them to take a video of it, not until that one time. That was the first time somebody took a video of it and I told them not to post it because I was scared that people on management might find out and I might get kicked out of the job. That was the first time, but then who knew, the thing that made me happy the most and made other people happy the most would go viral that way. I never knew it was going to go that way. I tried to keep other people happy. Staying happy is a good thing. Laugh at your problems too. Don’t suck on it. Laugh at your problems and you have to admit sometimes that you might be a little stupid on some parts, but then you should laugh about it. It’s acceptance. It’s embracing your imperfections. Once you do that it’s going to be helpful for you. You’re going to be able to laugh at things easily and understand that life is imperfect. It was meant to o upwards and downwards. You have to learn to be happy so that you can be more resilient.

Chris Williams:

Let me review real quick. So you said gratitude beats attitude. What was your phrase?

Fatima Palma:

Gratitude offsets attitude.

Chris Williams:

Gratitude offsets attitude. So, first is be thankful. Second, be happy or just laugh at yourself, just enjoy it and have some fun.

Fatima Palma:

Just enjoy it and just don’t a lot of things seriously.

Chris Williams:

Okay. Number three then.

Fatima Palma:

Number three I guess is you have to have faith. Regardless of what religion you have, you find faith. I realized I’ve fallen so many time in my life and the only person I was able to talk to was God and my parents. If people have faith on you, that’s enough for you to move on. If one person has that much of a faith in you, that’s enough for you to move on. I find faith through God and through my parents. I find that whenever I talk to people, especially my parents who are always motivating me, and when I talk to God, it releases a lot of my frustrations, my fears. You just have to give it all to him because at the end of the day, we all go back to where we came from. If there’s one thing that people forget sometimes, it’s understanding that life is being held by a greater power. It was just not always about us. It was not just always about our intellect, our knowledge, you have to understand that there’s also a greater somewhere out there. That greater being, I’d like to recognize it as God, but for other people it could be something else. That greater being, for whatever it is, I believe that faith can move mountains. I like to believe so.

My faith before was this small, but before I go to work I just pray it out and it just started to grow bigger and bigger. I like to point this out, whatever it is, I’d like to believe that we all serve the same God, probably just different names. When your God sees that you have enough faith to push through life’s circumstances, he’s going to give you eventually what you want. You just have to ask. I guess that’s what people are missing out on. They try to use their full knowledge and their intellect just to manipulate things around them, but they do not understand that there was always an easy out to that. You just always have to ask and pray and believe and things will happen for you. That’s the true sign of hope. When you believe in something you do not see. We all have different Gods and I’d live to believe that, but I’m sure all of them, when they see that person have that much faith on something they do not see, they’re going to be given the things they want and things they do not expect that’s going to happen.

Chris Williams:

You just said the statement about hope, you said “faith is believing in something you don’t see” and that, I think, is a really good definition for hope too. Believing in something you really can’t see. So, 1, 2 and 3, I’ve got be thankful, have fun and number three then is be a person of faith. Have faith in a God out there who really has your best part.

Fatima Palma:

He sees your heart more than anything else. I think God saw the intention in me. I think I was put through that test. Whatever was happening to me for the past five years, I was being put on a test. I never gave up on it and I don’t know what happened. Next thing I know I was asking him to give me more strength so I can go on. Whenever I pray, I always try to say this, that he gives me a bigger heart. If he gives me a bigger heart, I would be able to help more people. I would be able to see things on a different perspective. That is one thing that kept me going. That heart of mine that wanted to always share, wanted to make other people happy. If you’re going to ask me the last part, here’s the last part, dear people of the world, try to live for others. Don’t just try to live for yourself. Please live for others. You will never know the last days of your life. You will never know that. What if it is today? I am not saying that you help out in a big way, but if you can on little ways, that would be awesome. For example, going through the subway and an old lady needs to sit down, just give that lady the seat. You live for other people, understanding that that is what life is about, being able to help. You, yourself, you’re already okay and other people aren’t that okay. Meaning to say, you have the resources to help out other people to make their lives better. Through you, the world is able to see that miracles exist. I think if there is one thing that people should remember is not just to live for themselves. Do not live for the world’s sake, do not live on worldly things. Live on things that can feed your mind and your heart spiritually.

I’d rather be remembered by people for the things I’ve done, not because of the things I gave them. Just like my patient, the patient I was rapping to on the video is actually a dying cancer patient. He died after a month. I rapped to him two weeks before he died. He never moved before I rapped. Before I rapped to him, he never was able to move his body, but if you look at the video, he was trying to move his body upwards just to hear me sing. I would never understand the extent of the things I did not until the relative told me that the reason why they posted the video was that was the only time they saw their dad move again. They were that happy that at least at some point in their lives they were able to see their dad move again after what happened. I was like, you will never understand that this will forever be banked in your memory. “My dad is not going to be able to speak, but he saw you and he was trying to move his body”. You can see on the video he was trying to move his body upwards. What I’m trying to get at is we will never know the extent of the good things that we’re going to be able to do to other people, but then one thing is for sure, they’re going to remember you for that good thing that you’ve done. That itself is priceless.

Chris Williams:

Fatima, you just said incredible things. I am so proud to have you as somebody who’s interviewing with this project of a thousand people of hope around the world. I think we’re allowed to have, if my numbers are right, 10 to 12 people from the Philippine Islands. About 8 million people on planet earth gets to have one representative in the survey if we try to stay as pure as we can to world demographics and I’m thrilled that you’re doing this. It’s been so inspiring. So inspiring. You’re just so positive. Thank you.

Alright. The last question, I think you might be really good at this question I ask everybody. It’s not one of the five, but what’s your favorite thing to listen to when you need to lift your spirit and just feel more hopeful or positive or laugh? What are you going to turn on?

Fatima Palma:

What am I going to turn on?

Chris Williams:

Yes.

Fatima Palma:

Okay. This will be funny. I try to turn on to Lauryn Hill every time. Lauryn Hill, The Fugees. I like hip hop a lot. I’m sorry. I like Nas. It makes me feel good. Nas, Talib Kweli. I like them. I like hip hop per se, but then if you’re going to ask me when I switch on TV, basically it’s just HBO. HBO and E! These things make me happy. I don’t want to go home from work and read out all the news all the time. One thing that makes me happy aside from the things I listen to, just TV, movies. Things that make me happy, my dog. Hip hop makes me happy. Fugees, The Roots. Makes me really happy.

Chris Williams:

I love it. You’ve just done so great. Tell me now, where can we find you? I want to put some links on. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube? Links where people can find you, connect, ask questions, whatever.

Fatima Palma:

I prefer they add me on Facebook or Instagram or whatever site they have.

Chris Williams:

Which Facebook account?

Fatima Palma:

The main fan page is Fatima Palma The Nurse Rapper, but you know what either way as long as they follow me and they want to ask questions, feel free to do so. I will reply don’t worry.

Chris Williams:

How do we find your Instagram? Is there a certain handle?

Fatima Palma:

Fatima Palma. You’ll see me as the nurse, the crazy things I do in the hospital. It’s going to be fun.

Chris Williams:

We’ve been on there. It’s really fun. Fatima thank you so much. We had so much fun.

Fatima Palma:

Thank you. Same to you. I had so much fun too.

Chris Williams:

See you later. Thanks.

Fatima Palma:

See you.

Chris Williams:

Bye.

Fatima Palma:

Alright. Bye.

You’ve just listened to I Share Hope. If you’re ready to make a change, head to our website at isharehope.com and claim your free copy of the Top Ten Actions of Hope from World Leaders to use hope in your own life. Thanks for listening and we’ll talk to you next time.

About Chris

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