I Share Hope

Site Mobile Information Drawer

Story. Action. Hope.

Stories about hope and ways to share hope

Program Info

Program Info

LIKE WHAT YOU READ? SHARE WITH FRIENDS!

Jonathan-Silk-I-Share-Hope

Jonathan Silk

twitter

facebook

website

“I was near the front of the truck, it blew me to the back of the truck. I just remember lying there and then I came to it. It was really weird and all the noise started coming back. I got up and got back in a fight. I started maneuvering my soldiers, we had nine wounded and that’s when it really started sinking in like, wow, we’re in a huge fight. I’m Jonathan Silk and I share hope.” — Jonathan Silk

Accountability and Vulnerability Create Courage. The story of actionable hope from MAJ Jonathan Silk.

MAJ Jonathan Silk is a triathlete, warrior, educator and an advocate for veterans and wounded veterans. He is currently serving as the National Veterans Outreach Director for Team Red, White, and Blue. He frequently competes in triathlons to raise money for wounded veterans.

MAJ Silk was the recipient of the calendar year 2009 General Douglas MacArthur Leadership Award in May 2010 presented by the Army Chief of Staff, General George Casey. MAJ Silk’s awards include the Bronze Star Medal for Valor and the Purple Heart.



11: Jonathan Silk: Accountability and Vulnerability Create Courage: I Share Hope

“I was near the front of the truck, it blew me to the back of the truck. I just remember lying there and then I came to it. It was really weird and all the noise started coming back. I got up and got back in a fight. I started maneuvering my soldiers, we had nine wounded and that’s when it really started sinking in like, wow, we’re in a huge fight. I’m Jonathan Silk and I share hope.” – Jonathan Silk

Intro:

Welcome to I Share Hope! The podcast where world leaders share their real stories of hope and how you can use actionable hope to start changing your life today and now here’s your host, Chris Williams.

Chris Williams:

This is Major Jonathan Silk and when you hear about this guy, you’ll realize why I’ve made a mistake probably in interviewing Jonathan Silk rather than his wife, Stacy. You never know who has shared more hope in situations like this. Staci and Jon live in West Point, New York with their kids. He’s a triathlete, advocate for veterans and wounded warriors, Jon serves for Team Red, White and Blue as the National Veterans Outreach Director.

Jon started in the army as an infantry man in 1987. He has a lot of accomplishments with the military. He served in Iraq, Korea, Afghanistan and now proudly glad to have him back in the USA. He has received the General Douglas MacArthur Leadership Award for exhibiting exemplary leadership in the areas of duty, honor and country. I looked that up earlier Jon, that’s really amazing. Not many folks get that. A bronze star with distinguished “V”. The icon “V” stands for valor and the Purple Heart. He has quite an education, several degrees and masters in learning, technologies is also another masters in University of Texas and a business degree.

He is currently an educator at the Center for the Advancement of Leadership Development in Organizational Learning at the United States Military Academy in West Point, teaching some of the nation’s and world’s greatest future leaders. If you know much about West Point, you’ll realize that the folks who go through there are not just our soldiers, there’s a lot of very special people from around the world who get to come and experience one of the best educations on the planet.

Jon, thanks for all you’re doing. I know you have even more to tell us. Jon has a really interesting story of some things from his days in the military, but Jon a little more about yourself and then I’m going to get into the questions.

Jonathan Silk:

Thank you Chris. You did a good job in the intro. Right now, I enjoy endurance sports, enjoy time with my family and enjoy doing work with veterans especially veterans that are transitioning. A specific thing I’m very passionate about is this Wounded Veterans and helping them recover both mentally and physically and then rebuilding their lives or continuing on with their lives. They’re getting a part of the American dream they’re entitled to.

It’s just a different thing coming back. No matter what you’re doing, you’re part of a team, so a lot of soldiers, I think, struggle. There’s a sense of purpose when you’re overseas and you’re part of a team that has led you to being focused and purposed to accomplish a mission. Once you get back to the states, a lot of soldiers don’t see that, they haven’t felt that same purpose and then usually they become isolated when they get out of the military. Things can sometimes spiral out of control from there.

Chris Williams:

I’m glad you’re doing it. I really am. Thanks for the help. Well, you know how this works, Jon. We ask five questions about hope and the first one is soft ball, so give it your best.

Question 1: How do you define hope and/or what’s your favorite hope quote?

Jonathan Silk :

I want to say, Desmond Tutu said this, “Be able to see that there is light despite all the darkness”. That’s really what hope is to me, being able to see that light out there, that knowing if I get to the end of the tunnel. A tunnel might seem all dark.

Chris Williams:

That’s a really good one. Say it one more time for me.

Jonathan Silk:

Hope is being able to see that there’s light despite all the darkness.

Chris Williams:

I think you might have to reference question one again here.

Question 2: In your life, who’s given you the most hope?

Jonathan Silk:

I thought a lot about that question. I derive hope from people around me, not just…It’s hard to say one person. My wife Staci definitely give me a lot of hope, my kids, but those other veterans and soldiers and friends around me, seeing people dealing with adversity, not necessarily soldiers but people are generally dealing with adversity and overcoming adversity and they give me hope. I draw strength from watching other people’s, reading other people’s stories, hearing other people’s stories.

Chris Williams:

I do too which is a lot of the reason why I’m doing this because I need more.

Question 3: Tell us a story here, take your time. We’d love to hear details. Set a good scene for us. When was hope all you had? How did you use hope to make it through a tough situation?

Jonathan Silk:

When I was deployed in Iraq, at one point we were in a fight in Southern Iraq on April 09, 2004. Our mission was to seize a bridge in Al Kut, Iraq. We attacked the bridge and we were supposed to seize the far side at the intersection on the eastern side. Our intelligence had told us that there will be no enemy resistance once we’re in position or we might make enemy contact later. Another platoon cleared the narrow side, they got into a pretty big fight that lasted about 30 minutes. At that point, we knew there was enemy in the area. Right far across, we had an Apache gunship passed onto us, it did a quick recourse into the far side in which he described there’s a building which is an Iraqi police station, but he came over the net, so my mistake I said negative enemy contact.

So, we started our attack. Two of my trucks, I had six trucks in total. Two went out about 500 yards in front of me then I moved and then I had in my rear section, behind me by about 500 yards behind me. I remember coming over the bridge and there was a little crust in the bridge coming over, looking in the far intersection, there’s this like wave of tracers, three tracers crisscrossing. My trucks, one of them had already been engaged. A couple RPGs are smoking, the other one was a dead stop and it got engaged as well. Then we came at an intersection, my driver, God bless him, swerved. We started taking machine gun fires, we were coming at an intersection and there was like a wave of steady tracers. I don’t know how it didn’t get hit. We impacted with the median, like in a sidewalk, Iraqi sidewalk for like 6 feet in the air. So, we hit it and we crashed and came to a complete stop. We were sitting there, we started taking fire.

When we crashed, I got hurled into the dashboard. There was a little metal mount where the global positioning system sits. I got hurled onto that and took a hit to the chest. Recovered from that, I had to dismount to get in a fight. My driver was okay and my gunner was a little shaken up. As I dismounted, I took a firing position up over the hood and that’s when we got engaged. A rocket propelled grenade – I was moving toward the hood to get in a firing position and that’s when it hit, it did detonate. I wouldn’t have been here. It ricocheted up and hit me in the chest. I was now in front of the truck, a boom at the back of the truck. I just remember laying there, probably it wasn’t more than a minute but my driver was over there by my side and then I kind of came to, it was really weird, and all the noise started coming back. I got up and got back in the fight.

Chris Williams:

You were able to get up in the middle of all that?

Jonathan Silk:

I didn’t have a choice. I got back in the fight and started maneuvering my soldiers, we had nine wounded, secured them in an area where they could get their wounds treated and that’s when it really started sinking in like, wow, we’re in a huge fight. We haven’t been in a fight like this yet.

I started trying to make or get communications with my commander, trying to get a gunship in there, that didn’t work right away. Once I had my wounded secured, I took the remaining of my soldiers and we started maneuvering, established the base of fire and started maneuvering on some manning positions and disengaging and destroying those positions and taking them out. I kept calling trying to get a gunship in there and they never came in. The Apache came back, he kept coming over the net saying, you know, too dangerous for him. Eventually, I couldn’t maneuver, we’re still taking fire from a position I couldn’t get to. I don’t have enough soldiers, so I ended up pushing my wounded back across the bridge to the other platoon where they had secured area. We pushed back across the bridge and we brought in an AC130 Spectra gunship. That finished off the one enemy position we couldn’t get to. We went back across the bridge and cleared up the remaining houses. Anyway, it ended up successful in our mission.

The next day, fast-forwarding a little bit, we got relieved back on the space. A quick lesson on this is, the coalition force is at that time in 2004 and southern Iraq, also Ukrainian, the Georgians, some of our coalition partners, they had been sent over there with different rules of engagement. The enemy at the time, the insurgent force we’re engaging is the Shiite Militia, the Mahdi Militia. Earlier that week, they had pushed the Ukrainian force and the Georgian, I would say there’s a Georgian contingent too, they pushed them back on their base. That’s where we operate out of.

The next morning, we’re back on there, we stocked on ammo and everything, getting ready to conduct the operations, took my vest off, had a bruise on my chest, my plate was cracked. I didn’t think anything of it. I was good to go. I didn’t get checked out. I forgot to mention, I took another hit in the side during the fight, some more shrapnel. It knocked me over, but it wasn’t as bad as the first one.

Chris Williams:

During the same fight?

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. In the middle of the fight. That fight lasted – I’m sorry if I jump around. The fight in the bridge lasted about 3-1/2 hours for us.

Chris Williams:

Wow. Any injuries from the shrapnel from the side hit?

Jonathan Silk:

I’m not sure what contributed to the injury I’m about to describe. I finished out the deployment, we continued conducting operations. From there, we went down to Najaf area of Iraq, so a lot more fighting and then taking more hits.

Once we got deployed back home, got back home, went on leave, we started getting back on our regular garrison routine doing physical fitness everyday, my level of fitness wasn’t improving with everybody else. I knew there was a problem. I kept pushing myself. I was not running good, I was always smoked and I thought there was something wrong with me. I kept calling myself a wuss. My inner voice is like, what’s wrong with you? I went in to get my hearing checked because my ears were always ringing from the firefights and the tanks were around and main gun, again sidetracked, but a lot of times we were around that. We had tanks – I went to get my hearing checked and they did brain MRI, just to rule out brain tumor. Brain tumor causes your ears to ring as well. They found a clot in my brain, a very small clot. That’s not normal. One thing led to another and I ended up at a cardiologist. They did an echo in my heart and asked if I took a trauma to the chest in Iraq. I told them the story. It turns out when that hit, it’s very similar to traumatic brain injury – the impact toward my mitral valves in my heart.

Chris Williams:

Oh my goodness.

Jonathan Silk:

In hindsight, yes, I had all the symptoms of the injury, but I never realized it.

Chris Williams:

How long after the fight is this medical exam?

Jonathan Silk:

Probably about five to six months they found the clot and after that about another month they did that, so probably about six months. I’ve been doing everything everyone else was doing. My heart was leaking. It was also called mitral valve prolapse, the heart pumps, the blood actually flows to the mitral valve which has been damaged. 60% of the blood was flowing out into my body, 40% was staying in the heart chamber. My heart was actually working harder to make up for the blood that was leaking. That’s the one muscle in your body you don’t want too enlarged because you have a limited size chest cavity. There’s no room for it to grow.

Anyway at that point, there was a hey, stop all activity and we’re going to do surgery. We think we can repair the valve, but just in case we can’t repair it, we have to replace it. We have two options here, there’s a pig valve which will last 10 years and have that surgery again. I was like, you know, I was 35 at the time or was I 36? No, 36 sorry. I was still young. They were very confident they could repair the valve. I said I’ll go with the carbon fiber valve because that will last 400 years. I could tell that to my grand kids.

Chris Williams:

Yes.

Jonathan Silk:

So, we had surgery. Really great surgeon, he’s a former army cardiac surgeon. I was in Louisiana which is if you’ll get heart surgery, one of the best places too because they have a lot of problem with obesity and heart disease, so it’s actually a great place to have heart surgery. I was staying at Fort Polk in Louisiana at the time. Once this was diagnosed, they did not send me to Walter Reed. They just kept me there and they were going to do it locally which turned out to be good. The surgeon, instead of cutting my chest, he was certified in his technique that you go through the rib cage. It’s not evasive. It turned out to be critical later because it was one of the reasons I was kept on active duty. Anyway, I had the surgery and when I woke up, I remember waking up and I was in ICU, I couldn’t talk, it was rough. I immediately started choking.

I remember my wife holding my hand and it was bad. I felt like I was suffocating, I had some kind of blood in my lungs or something. I couldn’t talk to her, but somehow she knew what I wanted to know. Did they repair the valve or did they replace it? She said, “I’m sorry, they replaced it”. At that moment, I remember turning to the side and shutting my eyes. That was just like, wow. I’ve been enlisted for 15 years before I went off to Candidate School and I became an officer because I wanted to be a commander. I was still just a lieutenant and your whole vision, your dream just ripped away like that, that was what was happening as I woke up.

Chris Williams:

How did you have to recover from that? Just inside your head.

Jonathan Silk:

I don’t know. I was there. I was probably in a very dark place for a couple of days while I was in the ICU. Once I got moved out of the ICU, I had more friends and family coming in there and my triathlon coach, someone who I had to spent a lot of time doing my triathlons more than I – I was a triathlete before the war and one of my goals was to do half iron man and iron man. I had the doctors telling me, hey I got this great disability pension and thank you for your service, but you’re going to be disabled. You won’t stay in the military, there’s no way they can keep you.

Having this carbon fiber valve or prosthetic valve means that I’d have to have a blood donor for the rest of my life. The carbon fiber valve in the heart attracts red blood cells which forms clots and that’s the last place you want to have a clot. That’s where the previous clot in my brain – when I was injured, when I took the hit, it broke loose. That’s where that clot came from. I was in a pretty bad space, but then I started to have friends and family coming in and this triathlon coach, Stacy McMickens, she was just yelling at me “Iron Man, Iron Man” and here I’m like laid up in bed. I got a tube out of my butt. That was when I started to see the light. That was the first glimpse of hope I had. That’s really what shook me. I said hey, there’s hope. It was a dark place, but I saw the light after that.

Chris Williams:

Wow. So, recovery, months? Years? I mean are you recovered today?

Jonathan Silk:

I got out of the hospital, I spent about 12 days in the hospital and got home. By that time, I was walking on my own. It seems after that point where she was yelling triathlon, triathlon, iron man, iron man, is when I – that was a tipping point where life started getting better. I got my strength back and stuff. I got home and we were living in Alexander, Louisiana, you know, it’s fairly close to Fort Polk. These hospitals handling my rehab, they weren’t used to having young, athletic people doing this type of recovery. They’re used to dealing with elderly cardiac patients. The first day of rehab I’m asking questions like, when can I get on my bike? When can I start running?

Now, I had a better glimpse at the light. Hope was coming back and I was like, I want to recover. I want to stay in the military. I had a heart rate monitor from doing a triathlon training. They ended up giving me some heart rate guidelines and I started training within that. I was on my bike and my trainer slowly progressed from there. Five months after surgery, I was participating in sprint triathlon as a part of a relay team.

Chris Williams:

No way.

Jonathan Silk:

I did the bike, it had 20-mile bike.

Chris Williams:

I don’t mean to slant anything negative on any folks who had been through a hard physical injury, but I’m saying, are you competing against athletes without injuries?

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. Everyday healthy people.

Chris Williams:

Wow.

Jonathan Silk:

I think disabled people – I mean I don’t look disabled because I still got all my arms and limbs, but obviously internally I’m like the $300,000 man.

Chris Williams:

You’re kind of like Iron Man.

Jonathan Silk:

Yes.

Chris Williams:

This whole thing going on in your chest.

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. I was normal and I did pretty good on our relay team. I don’t know if we placed, we’re definitely at the top 50%. It’s not like I was suffering. I did the ride. It wasn’t a flat ride. It was a relatively hilly ride.

Chris Williams:

Sure. Congratulations.

Jonathan Silk:

Well then, 10 months after surgery I did a full spread triathlon on my own and then 11 months after I did an Olympic distance and then went to my next Leadership course. I don’t run as fast as I used to, but passed my physical fitness test and they did a medical check on me, put me through big evaluation and I got cleared to stay on active duty. I went to Korea for 18 months, commanded a tank company near the border of North Korea. I came home and one of my goals as I stayed before was do half iron man. I got home in October and April 9, I did the New Orleans half iron man. I completed that.

Chris Williams:

No way. That’s incredible.

Jonathan Silk:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

Chris Williams:

I’d say it’s incredible to anybody I know. This personal trainer, you owe her a half-half or a few harsh words, I’m not sure which one, but sounds like she yelled at you at the right time.

Jonathan Silk:

Yes she did. Whenever I flick back on that, that’s one of the things that sticks on my mind.

Chris Williams:

We talked a few weeks ago about just where you are right now with hope and you mentioned something about just, you know, you keep bumping into on a daily basis or regular basis this thought of, man I’m not what I used to be. I don’t have the same speed, the same capacity. It sounds like you’re an incredible athlete before the injury and you’re still an incredible athlete compared to normal standards here in the US. How does that go in your head? What do you do in there and how are you getting through the daily hit of I’m just not what I was thinking I’d be at this stage of my life?

Jonathan Silk:

I feel like sometimes I’m racing or chasing my old identity. I’m a fairly big person, I’m 6’5”, weigh about 235. I used to run pretty quick, endurance was a lot better. Some days I do better and other days I think back and say hey, I used to be able to do this, no problem. Now I’m running slower, I’m not recovering as quick. It’s just a constant battle with my old identity. Some days I do a lot better with it, some days I catch myself feeling sorry for myself. In the end, I just accept the new normal. This is the new normal. That old person I used to be is not – I got to say goodbye to that. It’s like breaking up with someone.

Chris Williams:

That’s a really good analogy. It really is.

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. It’s a struggle. Just doing, you know, I love physical fitness and I get pretty fired up during workout. I get over pretty quick.

Chris Williams:

Good. How are you engaging in hope today? I hear your story, the relationships you have obviously around you have been an extremely bright point of hope. I like your definition of hope and one that I keep falling back to personally is it’s not optimism, it’s not hoping for something that I think could be farfetched or way out there in the future like I hope I’ll have so much money by a certain date or I hope I’ll get this next promotion or whatever at work, but more of an assurance of things that are reasonably going to happen. It sounds like you definitely had some people behind you who said, hey I know your capacity, I know it’s real for you, get off the bed and get on the bike and get out of your head and get into action. Get out of this one thought, the funk , the whatever.

Today, you’re working with a lot of warriors obviously, that or any other example.

Question 4: How are you using hope today to impact the folks around you?

Jonathan Silk:

One thing I did when I was in Grad school in Pepperdine, one of our assignments was we had to start a blog to influence a particular population. I was passionate about helping Wounded Warriors, Wounded Veterans, so I started a blog. I tick when I run, like if I were to be there running around the room, you would hear my valve, the carbon fiber valve. So, I did tick when I run. I was thinking, what’s a cool name for a blog? I was like, I tick when I run. I was pretty positive that domain name was not taken, so I did the search.

Chris Williams:

Probably not.

Jonathan Silk:

I got that and I started this blog. It started off as a grad school project, but then I just kept it up as I got out of school. I just write about things l do, endurance races. I logged that and I used that in my work with Team Red, White & Blue. One of my roles is the outreach director, veterans outreach director. I touch base with every wounded or disabled veteran that joins or any member that’s wounded or disabled because we have community members join as well. I will share them a link to my blogs like hey, here’s my story. I can relate to what you’re going through. Usually as I said, people don’t look at me and think I’m a wounded warrior or disabled. They don’t understand the internal injury I suffered. Once I share that with them, I think it helps people say, alright, this isn’t some guy that doesn’t understand what I’m going through. He overcame adversity himself.

So, I thought I’d share that and everyday I wake up, engaging in positive activity, working out. This weekend I just did the Fenway Spartan. Spartan race in Fenway park and I love doing stuff like that.

Chris Williams:

That’s awesome. That’s great.

Jonathan Silk:

I wake up every day and just glad to be alive.

Chris Williams:

Alright. So, before you go let me echo that. Make one good point about the Spartan race because that’s a fantastic event. What you’re saying from an action standpoint is, you are directly engaging with your own heart to get up, be positive and get out there. I understand some folks may say that’s optimism, yes but sometimes that’s where it starts and it doesn’t matter. The point is you got something tough going on, get back on your feet, think about it, take a deep breath. Sometimes that deep breath takes months, through a lot of counseling, sometimes it takes surgery, sometimes it takes a second and you can get back at what you’re doing at, get yourself ready and then you’re going after it from a team standpoint with folks who have related to same situations that you’ve related to.

That’s a really key point. There’s a lot of things that happen to us that we say “What in the world” and “Why” and I don’t know the answer to all those questions. It is amazing how much we get to become part of a community that’s dealing with the same things. There’s always somebody else out there who’s dealing with what you’ve dealt with. I think that’s really neat. It’s helped me a lot too. That’s cool. The Spartan race, it was a lot of fun?

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. It was a lot of fun. I’ve done it before, this is my third one. Just going back to your point on optimism, I think I draw confidence and strength from people around me, but to the things I’ve accomplished. If I get up one day and I’m able to run 5 miles or whatever it is, that gives me confidence and that gives me enough confidence knowing hey, in the new normal I can do this. I’m not fighting as my old identity, I’m not wishing I was at that old Jon Silk. Now, here’s a new Jon Silk. I can do this. I’m accepting it and satisfied with that. I hope that makes sense.

Chris Williams:

It makes a lot of sense.

Jonathan Silk:

It’s just I draw strength from my own accomplishments and those around me and that gives me confidence to go the next step. It’s just not blind optimism, it’s real progression. If I rode 5000 meters today, I know I can go out and row 5000 tomorrow. I’m making a difference in my own life. I’m taking control of my life and this new normal. I own the new normal.

Chris Williams:

It’s you or somebody else or something else. You may as well be the one.

Jonathan Silk:

Exactly.

Chris Williams:

Driving the ship there. Yes.

Jonathan Silk:

Being accountable for it, at the end of the day, I did volunteer to go in the military and the course started and I definitely wanted to be there. I went back and I chose to stay in the military as well. I went to Korea. I deployed to Afghanistan later as well which was a huge healing thing for me. Just being able to go back to combat – that was key in my mental health I think because I had recovered back to warrior status again. It might sound a little crazy, but to me mentally, yes. Here I go, I’m deploying back to combat, I’ve recovered enough.

Chris Williams:

You put two chest plates in the armor that time?

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. They’ve upgraded the armor. Yes. I served as an adviser, so I really wasn’t in a direct combat role. To me, that was a huge mental thing.

Chris Williams:

You’re back in the game.

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. Exactly. Back in the game.

Chris Williams:

Great job. Alright.

Question 5: How can people there listening take what you’re saying and do something with it?

You may be talking to somebody who’s dealing with depression, suicidal thoughts, they may have just had a divorce, they may have lost a job or something hard, maybe a teenager who’s wondering what to do with a tough relationship that’s bringing them in the wrong spot. What do we need to do to take that control? You’re saying, get out there, be active. Doing something to change what’s going on today.

Jonathan Silk:

First, it takes owning the problem. Being accountable for yourself and for your actions and submitting that your vulnerable. There’s vulnerability there. Once you acknowledge the vulnerability, I’m vulnerable, then you can say hey, you can start talking to yourself saying gather that confidence to overcome that vulnerability, overcoming adversity. That’s where courage comes from, then you have the courage to take the first step to conquer depression, conquer your physical disability, get over that relationship, that bad relationship, that loss, whatever that void in life is. Acknowledge the vulnerability, that gives you the courage and you can overcome that. Then, reach out and interact with others, find others, share stories, talk to other people, draw strength from those around you and keep going and don’t stop.

Chris Williams:

That’s great.

Jonathan Silk:

I hope that made sense.

Chris Williams:

It made a ton of sense. It does. I’m going to put those on the show notes on the website as well. I think that’s a great little bullet point. I can detail those out. That’s really fantastic. Thanks so much for sharing today. I’m impressed. I really am. We’ve all had hard times in our life, but you’ve had some pretty rough days at work. Harder days than I’ve had to work, that’s for sure.

Jonathan Silk:

I love doing what I do within the day.

Chris Williams:

I can tell. That shows up. Okay, so if folks are trying to get in touch with you, how can they connect to you? How can people find out where you are, what you’re doing and how to follow you along in your process?

Jonathan Silk:

Best way, you go to my blog, itickwhenirun.com. If you Google I tick when I run it will pop up. I’m on Twitter, @JSilkTeamRWB.

Chris Williams:

JSilkTeamRWB like red, white, blue?

Jonathan Silk:

Yes. I’m on Twitter there. I’m on Facebook, Jonathan Silk. Feel free to connect with me. Contact me through one of those platforms, I’d be happy to have a conversation.

Chris Williams:

Alright last question for you which is not one of the five, but it’s a fun one. What are you listening to when you need to get going?

Jonathan Silk:

I start off with some 80s stuff like Van Halen, there’s some Motley Crue. There’s research out there, it’s a great article in Wall Street Journal that music that’s over 120 beats a minute improves your performance during workout. So, I really get into some of the high energy like techno music, anything like that.

Chris Williams:

That’s fantastic. So, if you had to pick one song from Van Halen, what would it be?

Jonathan Silk:

Jump.

Chris Williams:

Jump from Van Halen. How about from Motley Crue if you had to pick one?

Jonathan Silk:

Kickstart My Heart.

Chris Williams:

That’s a good one. Kick start My Heart from Motley Crue. It’s great talking to you. Thank you again for your time today and thanks for your service for all of us here in the USA. I know there’s a lot of folks who’s listening abroad as well and regardless of political situations and who cheer for, when tough times are going on worldwide, it is always a privilege talking to somebody who’s taking their beliefs and what they stand for and really made a difference and impact and fought to be somebody, so thanks. Really appreciate it Jon. It’s good to talk to you. Alright man, enjoy your time. Bye.

You’ve just listened to I Share Hope. If you’re ready to make a change, head to our website at isharehope.com and claim your free copy of the Top Ten Actions of Hope from World Leaders to use hope in your own life. Thanks for listening and we’ll talk to you next time.

About Chris

Recent Posts

By: Czarina Atienza I’ve been freelancing as a transcriptionist for years now and I’ve transcribed a wide variety of topics from TV shows to legal to religion to medical. No matter how sensitive o…Read More

"Any man can father a child, but it takes a real man to be a dad." So for those who happily took up the challenge, thank you! You have made the world a better place by being there for your child. Some…Read More

My mom thinks I’m a champion. She thinks I can do all things better than anyone else. Sometimes she’s so persistent that I actually start believing that I can be one - a champion. As I grew older…Read More

On I Share Hope’s site you can read and listen to motivational podcast interviews with leaders from many walks of life. We reach out to people who are leaders in their fields to see what they can te…Read More

I Share Hope is a website, a community if you will, of people who give and receive motivation amongst each other. Through a series of motivation podcasts we hope to inspire people around the world to …Read More

LIKE WHAT YOU READ? SHARE WITH FRIENDS!

uxicached