I Share Hope

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Story. Action. Hope.

Stories about hope and ways to share hope

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Bill Courtney

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“The exponential rewards you receive as a reaction to the service that you give is phenomenal. If everybody understood that you get back in spades what you put in in terms of service, not only will everybody’s lives be more fulfilling – I mean can you imagine a society look like that? I’m Bill Courtney and I share hope.” — Bill Courtney

Bill Courtney is an American football coach, and theCEO of Classic American Hardwoods, a lumber company headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee. He is the subject of the 2011 Oscar winning documentary, Undefeated which chronicles his career as a high school football coach in the economically pressured area of Shelby County, Tennessee. Courtney goes against the grain of today’s me-first culture, while explaining why these time-tested principles are needed now more than ever. He shows that winning isn’t just about the score at the end of the game, or the profit margin. Ultimately, it’s about the impact you make on your fellow human beings and the legacy you leave behind. Now, in his first book, Courtney, Esquire magazine’s Coach of the Year in 2012, describes the key principles—including service, civility, leadership, character, commitment, and forgiveness—that have helped young people and adults to live better and more fulfilled lives.



 

08: I Share Hope with Bill Courtney

“The exponential rewards you receive as a reaction to the service that you give is phenomenal. If everybody understood that you get back in spades what you put in in terms of service, not only will everybody’s lives be more fulfilling – I mean can you imagine a society look like that? ” – Bill Courtney

Intro:

Welcome to I Share Hope! The podcast where world leaders share their real stories of hope and how you can use actionable hope to start changing your life today and now here’s your host, Chris Williams.

Chris Williams:

I was reading about you and there’s really a lot there. I think the 2011 documentary, Undefeated is what really spun a lot of your public…

Bill Courtney:

That’s what spun it all.

Chris Williams:

You got an Academy Award?

Bill Courtney:

An anonymous scout from a lumber company, a coach in football and three guys from LA with one credit to their name which was a very heartfelt, warm documentary on the world series of beer pong. That’s the one thing these guys had ever done in their life. They show up wearing hipster clothes and carrying a couple of cameras, no satellite trucks, no big boom mics, nothing. In fact this equipment here is more than likely, probably a little more sophisticated than what they had. They said we want to film you and do a little short documentary like an ESPN 30 for 30.

Stayed two days, this is a bigger story than that, we’re going to go try to raise some money, we’ll be back and shoot a movie and I said we’ll see you later. It was three weeks before the season started, so I thought I’d never see them again. They show up in three weeks with two cameras, same three guys, no boom mics, no nothing and start recording and they leave Memphis with 560 hours of film, go back and edit for a year and make a movie I think no one will ever see. Maybe on channel 422 on Wednesday at 3:00 in the morning, okay? Seven months later I’m walking down the red carpet to Academy Awards.

Chris Williams:

Unbelievable.

Bill Courtney:

It is absolutely unbelievable.

Chris Williams:

So, the award was for best documentary of the –

Bill Courtney:

Best Feature Documentary. I mean it’s a real life Oscar, Academy Award deal. Absolutely.

Chris Williams:

That’s great. Congratulations. Now a book early this year came out and here’s what caught my attention, the reason I wanted to call you. There’s a quote in there, “There are countless others who prove regardless of how difficult their circumstances might be, human beings can turn their lives around. It’s never too late.” and that comes after a paragraph of example after example after example of just amazing folks that have worked for you or you worked with in the past who have come –

Bill Courtney:

Or I have coached or coached me or I’ve been involved with in society or politics or whatever, but it’s absolutely true. If there is air in your lungs and the sun comes up, you have hope for a better day. The title of the book, Against the Grain specifically meant that we have to go against the grain of conventionalism and thought. You see a guy wearing a suit and a briefcase, driving a nice car running around who volunteers in his church, everybody would say well look he’s got it made. You have no idea what’s going on inside that guy’s head and heart. You have no idea of the struggles that that person deals with, the sex addiction or the alcohol addiction or whatever.

The flip side is you see guy working out here on the shard and making $9.50 an hour, covered in grease wearing 2-year-old coveralls, driving a hoopty back home and you say, well poor guy he’s working hard. You have no idea the love and hope that could be in his heart with his family and his faith and his approach to life and his relationship with his kids.

The point is we characterize far too quickly and there are so much that is going on inside each individual, each one of us despite where we come from, despite our circumstances, despite the life or the road we’ve taken or laid out for ourselves, that we all have issues and we all have triumphs, but no matter what when the sun comes up and you wake up and take that first cognizant breath of fresh air, if you just look at the people around you and look at examples of amazing people who have done amazing things, I don’t know how you cannot have hope for a better day.

Chris Williams:

Well said. It’s hard to believe that some days when you’re the guy without the hope, but getting to the next day and getting down the road a little bit helps you get a normal perspective.

Bill Courtney:

When I get it, you know, it’s interesting you’re being surrounded by a thousand people and be the most lonely human on earth. I get that goes on, but what I’m trying to – in that portion of the book, the book is not about this but it’s the portion of the book. What I’m trying to say is if you’re that lonely person, take a second, remove yourself from yourself. Don’t take the face off of yourself and look at the people around you and the examples that we have of people who, despite all circumstances, despite past transgressions, despite all their past failings have found a way to pull themselves up. If they can do it, you can do it.

The first chapter in Against the Grain is about Sam Quinn, Sam works here now but when Sam came to me he was a 40-year-old living at Lighthouse Ministries, three-time addict, drug addict, alcohol addict, everything. He was a former Marine, had nothing and he started working here as a laborer as a 40-year-old for, I think, $7.25 an hour. Seven years later, Sam is married and I don’t mean living with a shack up only. I mean got the piece of paper married, adopted her three children, coaches them, lives in a 2000 square foot house in Frasier, is the manager here making a mid-5 figure salary and has gotten rid of all the DUI, back stuff has cleared. All his name from the CORBS and is a model citizen and an integral part of my business. That happened in seven years from Lighthouse Ministry addict with a rap sheet you would not believe to married, children, home, great job and living a fulfilled life and the best thing about it is everyday he gets to look in the mirror and be proud of who he sees.

If that guy could do it, you should have hope that anybody can do it.

Chris Williams:

You’re right. It’s a good story. It’s a great story.

Bill Courtney:

Yes. It’s first chapter of the book. That’s why I opened with it.

Chris Williams:

Let me get into the five questions. We have five questions we ask each person that we interview on hope.

Question 1: Your definition of hope, the best definition you’ve heard or quote about hope.

Bill Courtney:

It’s really just the way I look at hope. Hope is a positive attitude despite your past. Having a positive outlook and energy to keep going despite all of your past transgressions and failings. To have that kind of hope, I think you have to understand forgiveness and grace. I think you have to understand that you can be forgiven for anything you’ve done if you genuinely ask for that forgiveness and are willing to make amends. I think the other part of forgiveness is even more important than that because I think we have to be able to understand, we have to forgive ourselves. If you find forgiveness and grace in your heart and seek forgiveness and are able, through that forgiveness, to be able to forgive yourselves, then you can let your past failings and transgressions go and have a positive outlook for tomorrow. That’s how I see hope.

Chris Williams:

That’s great. Getting rid of our own bad thoughts about ourselves is a big deal.

Bill Courtney:

It’s the worst.

Chris Williams:

Forgiving myself. It’s easy to forgive somebody else than me.

Bill Courtney:

It’s so much easier to forgive somebody else than yourself. It is, but you have to understand if you can’t forgive yourself, then the forgiveness you offer someone else is fairly shallow.

Chris Williams:

You’re right. Good point. Alright, the next one.

Question 2: Who’s been the most helpful in delivering hope to you? Who’s given you the most hope growing up, now, whenever?

Bill Courtney:

Christ because I’m a fallen, wretched human being and I do things on a daily basis that I regret, but I’m able to – I’m not able to say it’s okay because I believe in God, but what I am able to do is to leave that stuff at his feet and wake up the next day without the burden of that guilt which gives me hope that I can be better and that I can do better on a daily basis. Honestly that’s where my hope comes from. On earth, maybe an illustration you might be looking for more-

Chris Williams:

Looking for your answer on that-

Bill Courtney:

That is my answer, but also a guy like Sam Quinn. Not the president of the United States or some guy. The people who inspire me on hope is when I look at the everyday guy who wakes up everyday and does the very best he can and is proud of their efforts. Those types of people give me the most hope because I believe our society is only because of its weakest link. We have a lot of weak links and a lot of people that suffer from disenfranchisement and sorrow and abject despair and poverty and loss. When I look at just normal folks do something to better their lives and better their families’ lives, then I know that’s available for everybody if they’ll just do it. That gives me hope for a better society and a better country and a better world.

Chris Williams:

Beautiful. Powerful.

Question 3: When’s the time when you’ve had to really rely on hope? You’ve just hit the bottom personally, not somebody else story, when it’s been a time that hope is really all you had to go back to or something you’re pulling hard in. Kind of paint the picture. Give us the view.

Bill Courtney:

I started this business in 2001 off my couch with $10,000. I was 31 years old, I had 1-year-old, a 2-year-old, a 3-year-old and a 4-year-old and a wife.

Chris Williams:

Few mouths to feed.

Bill Courtney:

Few mouths to feed and I was 31 and the vice president of a pretty large company making a lot of money. I was being very well paid and I quit and started this company. From that point until 2006, we rolled along pretty well and grew and went from six employees to I was at 120 employees and we’re doing about $40 Million in sales and the bubble hit, the economies’ bubble hit.

I got my books, my profit and loss statement, I get that every 30 days on the 15th of the following month and we had lost everything we’d made the previous nine months to that one 30-day period because of the economy hit. To give you some perspective, the hardwood lumber industry in 2002 produced 14-1/2 billion board feet, by this time it was producing four. Serious shrinkage was happening all around us. Friends of mine in business were going bankrupt, my customers are going bankrupt and I laid in bed at stared at the ceiling thinking I’m done.

That Sunday, I got up and I got the books out and I started slashing like, okay, how can I survive? That following Monday, I came to work and I had to lay off 60 people that day. Between 50 and 60 people and I’m talking about people who had been with me since day one that had done nothing wrong and I knew that they were going to have to drive home going into the worst economy we’ve seen since the great depression and look their families in the face and say “I don’t have a job anymore”. I knew not only what I was facing, what my business was facing, but because of my failure to be able to keep this place where it needed to be despite the external pressures, the economy, I saw it as a personal failure. Because of that personal failure, I was sending 60 people home to a dire situation. I’m telling you, it was the toughest day of my life. I left, I drove home from this place that day embolden because honestly, I was worried. It would disingenuous to say I weren’t worried about me and the business, but I was worried about what have I done?

Despite it, I knew that I did what I had to do to try to save for the whole the greatest that I could and we did. When the industry went from 14-1/2 being to four being, we took a step back that year and then over the remaining six years of this recession that we’re just now coming out of, my business has doubled. I’m back to 120 employees, we’re back up around $45 Million in sales, I’ve got offices all over Asia and Europe. The facilities are here and I’m telling you, I didn’t have much that day that I had to lay off everybody except hope.

Chris Williams:

Wow. Wow, that’s powerful. In that process, you’ve come through that obviously, the hope paid off so to speak

Bill Courtney:

Yes, but it wasn’t just blind hope. It was hope that the decisions that I was making were the right ones for the majority of people around me, from my children and wife to my employees, to myself. But, I just don’t think you can have blind hope. I think you garner a greater sense of hope if you look yourself in the mirror, make tough decisions and make the choices that inspire hope. I knew that hope would carry me, but I also knew that it was my job to foster hope not only just for me, but amongst those – because can you imagine the shock value of the employees left sitting around here?

Chris Williams:

They wonder if they’re going next.

Bill Courtney:

They wonder if they’re going next, wonder if the place is going bankrupt, my wife’s wondering if we’re going to have a house, my kids are wondering where they’re going to go to school. To foster hope for those around you, you have to make the best decisions, communicate those decisions to those around you, explain the situation, be honest, look yourself in the mirror, be honest with yourself and be honest to those around you and say okay, look and stop, here’s where we are but here’s the steps we’re taking to be successful and we need to go to work because these steps will work and these steps and these actions should foster hope for a brighter future. That’s what we did.

Chris Williams:

That is so critical. I think that it’s important for folks listening that hope is not blind and if it’s just blind, its optimism and it’s not founded, but if it’s got legs and got a plan and has steps and has a reasonable expectation of becoming something then that’s hope.

Bill Courtney:

That’s hope.

Chris Williams:

I may hope I’m the next CEO of Google and I think that’s a pretty optimistic hope, but it probably won’t happen. But, hoping that I get to walk my kids to school tomorrow morning and they have a great day at school is a pretty realistic hope and I know how to help ensure that happens.

Bill Courtney:

Hope that these types of conversations reached 10,000 and 100.000 then 200,000 is realistic hope if you keep doing a good job and keep taking the steps you got to go. Keep working at it and keep getting interesting people to sit in front of your microphone for you. Those are things that are going to happen. That’s a realistic hope.

Chris Williams:

Exactly. Right.

Bill Courtney:

You can say, man, I hope I make it to the NBA one day. Well, what are you doing to work on that?

Chris Williams:

Yes.

Bill Courtney:

Is it a realistic goal for you? I think unrealistic goals actually diminish hope, but if you think about what realistic goals are and you methodically take steps to work toward those goals and you pour yourself into it, then I think you and those around you can see the realism of the goals, can see the effort and will also join in you with hope for what your goals are, what you’re seeking.

Chris Williams:

That’s really good. Really is good.

Question 4: What are you doing today to bring hope to other folks around you? People here, internationally, Memphis, local, you call it, wherever.

Bill Courtney:

I don’t know. I read that question I thought I don’t want to break my shoulder patting myself on the back. I mean I wrote a book that I hope inspires hope. I speak all over the country and I talk about servant leadership, getting out of your comfort zone, understanding the value of your legacy that I hope inspires people to think about themselves and their places and their family and their business and their society and their politics a little differently. I really do think that inspires hope for greater future individually.

Chris Williams:

I agree.

Bill Courtney:

Frankly in my business, I’m still in the lumber business and building is not the greatest thing in the world and so I continue to work hard around here and lead as an example and inspire hope to the employees of Classic American Hardwoods that we’re going to keep doing the right things and we’re going to keep growing and we’re going to keep building and people are going to get more and more out of this business in terms of salaries and bonuses if we continue to work hard together. So, there’s hope for a bright, a continued and brighter future for the employees of my business. Hope for my children that they can go to the college they want to and pursue the careers they have and hope for my wife that all of the work we have done with our family and the business lands us in our twilight years with a beautiful, happy, healthy family and the ability to enjoy it.

Chris Williams:

Sure. That’s good and again, I’m hearing hope with legs on it. There’s a plan.

Bill Courtney:

It has to.

Chris Williams:

There’s action. You’re doing something.

Bill Courtney:

You have to. If you just say, well I hope this is going to happen and then you go sit in a chair and wait for it to happen, I just think that’s foolish.

Chris Williams:

You mentioned a few things every now and then about you and something you hope happens to you, but 99% of the things you’re saying are all folks and those and I keep hearing that with other people I’m interviewing. That it’s giving, giving, giving, giving and you get so much in return because of that. But, if you stay focus on delivering some hope to another, you end up getting a whole lot more back.

Bill Courtney:

The exponential rewards you receive as a reaction to the service that you give is phenomenal. If everybody understood that you get back in spades what you put in in terms of service, not only would everybody’s lives be more fulfilling, but I mean can you imagine a society look like that?

Chris Williams:

Incredible.

Bill Courtney:

Yes. Maybe that’s an idealistic, utopian dream but the point is the more you talk about hope and the more you inspire others to serve and the more you inspire proper leadership and the more you throw away political correctness and replace it with open, civil, non-threatening conversations about the stuff that matter, that’s the stuff that gives me hope for a better society and country and future for my kids.

Chris Williams:

That makes sense. Okay, last question.

Question 5: Somebody listening call it hopeless because they have a chemical addiction or they’ve lost a job, financial trouble, relational problems, whatever maybe, give me some steps, the a, b, c, 1,2,3s and real simple, how do we get started pursuing hope for ourselves and for others around us?

Bill Courtney:

Got to be honest with yourself.

Chris Williams:

Okay, be honest, number one.

Bill Courtney:

You got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and acknowledge the scars. Second, once you are honest with yourself and recognized what you’re doing wrong, then you have to immediately rid yourself of the guilt of that. Guilt will keep people from doing a lot of things. The woe is me, all of that. You got to be honest with yourself, acknowledge what’s going wrong in your life and then you’ve got to recognize and you got to buy in to this: we are all failed.

Every human being has skeletons in their closet that (1) they never want anybody to know about and (2) are so similar to everybody else’s. You don’t have to know the specifics of them. To just know that everybody deals with immense pain and tremendous guilt and the things that they’ve done that they’re ashamed of and tremendous second guessing of who they are and what they’re about and the search for what you are.

So, if you’re in a rut, (1) be honest with yourself and admit you’re in a rut and if it’s an addiction to drugs or alcohol or porn or a big one, ego, if it’s an addiction to whatever your issues are, admit it. Just for once in your life, just look yourself in the mirror, be honest with yourself and then (2) immediately recognize that everyone of us deal with something. At least one something, typical multiple something, so don’t feel guilty about it and don’t think you’re the worst human being in the world because you’re not. Understand that we’re all failed and once you admit it and once you are able to forgive yourself and get rid of the guilt about it and recognize that we’re all in this boat together in terms of our emotional fears and inhibitions and self-consciousness and all of that, then get a snapshot of what you want to be.

First, in terms of a father or a mother, in terms of a parent, in terms of a business associate, in terms of somebody in your society and from that point, work your way back and itemize some steps that you think would be necessary to make that happen and then don’t worry about the goal anymore once you get the steps. Just go to step one and hammer it. Once you get to step one, then from there catapult to step two and hammer it. Don’t look 50 miles down the road. Look a mile down the road and get that mile behind you and then look 3 miles down the road and get those 3 miles behind you. Over the course of time, what you will find is each time you reach a hurdle, you can have hope for the next one because you’ve proven yourself you can do it. Every hurdle that you get behind you, you get farther and farther away from that person that you had to be honest with and feel guilty about. Then in some number of months or years, once you get close or to the goal that you want to be, then you will have evolved into a whole new person and there will be a new goal.

Chris Williams:

Good point.

Bill Courtney:

Then do it again. You can inspire people by your actions and that process will always give you hope to continue to develop and evolve and do better.

Chris Williams:

That’s great. So, being honest to myself, then getting rid of the guilt, I’m not the only one out there that’s got problems and then getting a plan, get some friends, counselor, family members, whatever to help make it to plan some steps to get it to move on from where I am today to where I want to be. Then, forget about that long range, too big to reach goal.

Bill Courtney:

First, once you get where you want to be, then work back the steps that you need to do to get there.

Chris Williams:

Then focus on the steps.

Bill Courtney:

Then forget it all and then go first step. Once it’s behind you, second step. Once it’s behind you, third step. When you get to third step, now you have a ton of hope and belief because look what you’ve done already. A lot of people say I want to get to this goal, they get halfway there and they feel like they’ve failed. No sir, every step is an accomplishment and you need to build on that accomplishment rather than the goal being the accomplishment. It’s the steps that are accomplishments and eventually you will continue to gobble up steps and get there and three quarters away to that original goal, that goal may not be your goal anymore. A new goal might change, so start over, but you know you can do it and you have hope you can do it because you’ve accomplished many goals along the way.

Chris Williams:

Sure. That’s great.

Bill Courtney:

This, by the way, is in Against the Grain.

Chris Williams:

Sounds like-

Bill Courtney:

It’s a shameless plug, but it really is. It’s in there.

Chris Williams:

That’s the point. You’ve got a lot of people asking you the same questions I’m asking you. Put it down on paper so we could read it.

Bill Courtney:

To be honest with you, I never wanted to write book. I did all the speeches and after two years of doing speeches all over the place, I’d had people come up and do you have it on disc? Where’s the book? I’m like, I run a lumber company and coach football. I do this occasionally as a side gig. This isn’t what I do, so I’m not like this guy that’s out there with the whole change your life thing. But, I talked to my agent and I said they keep asking about books and said you should write a book. So basically, the book is in response to the Q&As that I got after all these speeches. So, I arranged the book in a way that I thought we could talk about some stuff that mattered in a civil non-threatening way, but also address so much of what the speech has revealed to me people were thinking about.

Chris Williams:

The book, Against the Grain and the movie is on Netflix, that’s right. Undefeated. I’m sure you can pick it up on Amazon and everywhere else.

Bill Courtney:

Yes. The book on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. The movie, I think, is actually still at Barnes and Noble and Target. I know it’s on Amazon, it’s live streaming on Netflix.

Chris Williams:

How do people find you if they want to follow you online? Websites, Twitter, Facebook?

Bill Courtney:

If you want to know more about all this stuff, you can go to coachbillcourtney.com. You can follow me on Twitter, @IamCoachBill and @CoachBillSays. There’s links to all of this on coachbillcourtney.com.

Chris Williams:

Yes. I saw the links. There’s a lot there folks. If you’re going to look for this, please start there and there’s an excerpt of the book on that website as well that’s definitely worth looking at and you’ll see some quotes by some amazing people who got in deeper in the book. It really is incredible.

Bill Courtney:

I appreciate it.

Chris Williams:

Last thing, when you’re trying to get your head back in gear and you’re hitting the road, you’re going to drive across town, what are you going to listen to? What’s going to take you home and get you out of the funk?

Bill Courtney:

I saw that and you know what’s funny?

Chris Williams:

I love this question.

Bill Courtney:

It’s a tough question because it changes based on the day.

Chris Williams:

It does for me too.

Bill Courtney:

I will sometimes listen to ZZ Top just because I want to hear that. I will oftentimes listen to U2, Pride (In the Name of Love) is my favorite song. I will play that song 16 times over and over again. if I want to feel young again, I’ll listen to Cheap Trick because that’s the first concert I ever went to. Ironically enough, the lead guitars who played the five-arm guitar of Cheap Trick, his name is Rick Nielsen. His son has a band and he wrote the score for Undefeated.

Chris Williams:

Really?

Bill Courtney:

How weird is that? The first concert I ever went to.

Chris Williams:

Incredible. Is that a connection that you made or did they-

Bill Courtney:

It completely just happened. Absolutely. It was crazy.

Chris Williams:

Did you get to meet the guys from Cheap Trick?

Bill Courtney:

Yes. Absolutely. In fact, I was in Palm Springs and hung out with the drummer for them at a wedding and they were just about to go do – they’re still working. Anyway, I will tell you I will also spend a lot of time with Fox News and CNN and XM Radio and I will listen to Fox for 10 minutes and CNN for 10 minutes and I’ll go back and forth.

Chris Williams:

Just to keep it balanced?

Bill Courtney:

Well, it really is an interesting exercise to compare the spin on the same story and to recognize that there’s 10% crazies on the right and there’s 10% crazies on the left and 80% of us in the middle are rarely represented.

Chris Williams:

I like how you said the 80% in the middle.

Bill Courtney:

That’s who we are.

Chris Williams:

We all want to think we’re the normal ones in the middle, right?

Bill Courtney:

Well, I just believe that unfortunately part of the polarization of what’s going on in our country is as a result of our media pulling this where the other… When I sit down and talk to democrats or republicans or liberals and conservatives, the vast majority of us agree with about 85% of the same thing. The problem is, our representatives in politics and the media have become so polarized that they’re separating us. I just think we need to take us back and have civil, non-threatening conversations about the stuff that matters and tell the crazy pundits to go to hell.

Chris Williams:

This is a whole another podcast.

Bill Courtney:

It really is.

Chris Williams:

I should work on that. Alright. Thank you Bill Courtney.

Bill Courtney:

I’m happy to do it.

Chris Williams:

Amazing time. Thanks for your help and all the really easy, usable 1,2,3s how to do it all throughout.

Bill Courtney:

I appreciate you having me.

Chris Williams:

Thanks for your time.

Bill Courtney:

I’m Bill Courtney and I share hope.

Chris Williams:

So I am sitting here in a coffee shop near our house and I am thinking through everything that Bill has said. I just listened to the whole interview again. Its incredible and I think what really sticking is out to me in his presentation is that step by step process. So he is saying get a goal that maybe you’re something hoping for maybe getting out the clouds of depression or being a better parent or better spouse or partner or business partner or getting out a pretty hard situation that you feel trapped in because of the people around you can’t get rid of. Whatever it is he is saying yeah there is a long term there but you have break them into small steps and that’s really helpful to me because its easy for me to think I wasn’t the Dad I wanted to be today or I wasn’t the business partner I wanted to be today or I didn’t deal with my own depression that comes and goes to me that I wanted to today so I am missing the whole thing but that’s not really it. I need to have a daily steps..a small step something that I can do even in 5 minutes not a whole day that I can say that I have accomplish this…. That I have a great conversation with one of my children or I chose not to let my myself spiral emotionally and focus on doing the next thing versus thinking of how crappy I may feel. Those things are very important and succeed at those one small step at a time and fail now and then but succeed at small steps and they build..and they amount up to something real and that’s definitely where I am going in life and I really appreciate Bill’s comments here to help us understand that. Jump over I Share Hope if you like to. There’s a comments section down below everything about Bill Courtney. You’re gonna see his post on I Share Hope and you can find all the show notes information about and several more links and ways to engage to his process or you can find me and talk about this in twitter or facebook @chriswilliamshq. Look forward talking to you soon. Thanks so much.

You’ve just listened to I Share Hope. If you’re ready to make a change, head to our website at isharehope.com and claim your free copy of the Top Ten Actions of Hope from World Leaders to use hope in your own life. Thanks for listening and we’ll talk to you next time.

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On I Share Hope’s site you can read and listen to motivational podcast interviews with leaders from many walks of life. We reach out to people who are leaders in their fields to see what they can te…Read More

I Share Hope is a website, a community if you will, of people who give and receive motivation amongst each other. Through a series of motivation podcasts we hope to inspire people around the world to …Read More

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