I Share Hope

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Story. Action. Hope.

Stories about hope and ways to share hope

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Deborah Northcross

Deborah would like to connect via the comments section at the end of this page. If you have questions or comments for her she will be happy to joint you there.

“I have been really blessed, I think, that I have not had real tragedy in my life and I’m not wishing for it. If I have had that experience and I don’t know it, then I’m really blessed or I’m a really strong person that I have not recognized the really, really bad days in my life.”— Deborah Northcross



 

05: I Share Hope with Deborah Northcross

“I continued to hope that the other African-American students who were here with me and the white students who were here could get along and that did not happen every day. I have been really blessed, I think, that I have not had real tragedy in my life and I’m not wishing for it. If I have had that experience and I don’t know it, then I’m really blessed or I’m a really strong person that I have not recognized the really, really bad days in my life. I’m Deborah Northcross and I Share Hope.”

Intro:

Welcome to I Share Hope! The podcast where world leaders share their real stories of hope and how you can use actionable hope to start changing your life today and now here’s your host, Chris Williams.

Chris Williams:

I am talking to Deborah Northcross. She is a dear friend of mine and I am so looking forward to hear the story.

Deborah Northcross:

Well Chris, you know me as a board member of the Memphis Child Advocacy Center, but I am single female, long time Memphian, a workaholic, a failure at retirement. I’ve been an educator for the last 40 years and when I say I failed retirement, I really did. I did retire, but I did not like retirement so I found another job in the field of education and I remained a workaholic.

Chris Williams:

Good for you.

Deborah Northcross:

In fact, I did not ever turn off my alarm. It still goes off at 6:15 in the morning. I like education and I think my passion stems from my father who, at a very young age, at my young age, told me and my brothers to read. As I look around this room that we’re sitting in, their posters say “read, read, read” and I am impressed by that because we’re sitting in my high school library. I think that’s where my passion for education comes from.

Chris Williams:

That’s great. You have been in Memphis your whole life?

Deborah Northcross :

I was born in Nashville, spent a little bit of time in New York when my father was doing residency in New Jersey. We lived with his mother who lived in the Bronx. But having been born in Nashville, we spent a little bit of time with my mother’s mother living with her while my father was in dental school. For the most part, I’ve lived in Memphis.

Chris Williams:

Deborah and I have been talking about sharing her story, really to my kids, for months now and still haven’t made that happen, so maybe I’ll just take this recording at home and play it for them. No, we want to have you for dinner. Deborah’s story came to my attention through serving on the board with her at the Memphis Child Advocacy Center and I think it was Virginia Stallworth over there who mentioned a bit of Deborah’s history and I didn’t know. She is a wonderful piece of Memphis that without Deborah and her family, Memphis would be an unfortunate place. I’m sure others would step up and do some of the things that Deborah and her family have done, but they were at the right place, at the right time and had a phenomenal opportunity.

So, before we get into why we’re sitting here in the Central High School Library,

Question 1: Deborah tell me your favorite quote about hope or a quote that somebody else has that you just love and means a lot to you.

Deborah Northcross:

My favorite quote and I think it came from Oprah about hope is that “The next road is always ahead”. I think to me it means there’s something always to look forward to. It may be a better life ahead, a better opportunity ahead, but the next road is always ahead, so always look ahead. Not that you cannot look back and remember or learn from the past, but the next road is always ahead.

Chris Williams:

That’s a great quote. It really is. Oprah has done a phenomenal job at finding real life stories and putting them in a format that we can really relate to. All of that, it’s easy for me to look in my past and not really looking forward because I can blame a lot of things in my past, but I can only blame forward a lot of times on me. I’m scared to do that because I might do it wrong.

Deborah Northcross:

We can always learn from the past.

Chris Williams:

Yes.

Question 2: So, tell us who’s been the best deliverer of hope to you in your life? Who’s given you a lot of hope as you’ve grown?

Deborah Northcross :

I don’t think any one person, but I think teachers in general. I guess I’m reverting back to education. Teachers have always broadened my base of knowledge and I can think of a sixth grade teacher, a fourth grade teacher, my homeroom teacher here, I was just asking the principal about Ms. August Smith who was my Homeroom teacher here. But, just teachers in general who offered me more knowledge and broadened my base of knowledge which gave me opportunities to look at the next road ahead or seek the next road ahead.

Chris Williams:

Wow. Education is a big deal.

Deborah Northcross:

It is for me. Again, I guess it goes back to my parents always saying “read”. Even if it’s the funny paper or comic book, read. Read because it just expands you. It just broadens you.

Chris Williams:

Yes. There’s so many great efforts around the world for education and the more these interviews that I get to do about hope, the more I realize how connected education is to the hunger issue or human trafficking issue or poverty or racial issue or any kind of discrimination. You just go on and on and on in the ails of humanity and education seems to come back so many times.

Deborah Northcross:

I’m so fearful of the students today especially the younger kids who don’t have opportunities, educational opportunities or don’t take advantage of educational opportunities to broaden their horizons by reading, by exposing themselves to higher education. It makes me fearful for them for their future. I’m just fearful.

Chris Williams:

Sure. They’re at the mercy of someone who’s more educated than they are.

Deborah Northcross:

Absolutely.

Chris Williams:

They may not feel it, but its reality. Okay. So,

Question 3: Take us back in a time in your life, wherever you want. Paint a picture. Give us some histories and backgrounds, some context. What was life going on around you and what was life going on inside you and how did you use hope to get through some hard times?

Deborah Northcross:

Good question. When I think about that question I wonder if I’ve had that experience yet. Have I been in a situation where I have been so at a loss or so distressed that I’ve had to pull on hope? Because I’ve seen so many people around me who have been in a more dire situation than me and I don’t know that I’ve had that situation yet.

I think about the current progress in situation which is traumatic in so many ways and it could really happen right here in Memphis.

Chris Williams:

Yes it could.

Deborah Northcross:

I’m so proud of how Memphians have reacted or not reacted to the killing of Michael Brown. Getting back to me, I don’t know that I have had a situation that I have had to pull on hope yet. But then when I came here in 1966, I hoped that I could be in this educational community and get a fine education which I did in spite of the racial tension, in spite of the unwelcoming atmosphere. I knew why I was here and my parents continued to tell me, you’re here to get an education and I did — a very good education. But, I continued to hope that the other African-American students who are here with me and the white students who are here could get along and that did not happen every day. I had hoped there will be a prom in my senior year, but that never happened because they cut out the prom when the African-American students came here.

Chris Williams:

Wow.

Deborah Northcross:

Every day was not bad and I did make friends with some white students and I have some friends still today among the white community. But, I think I was hopeful of my three years here that things would just be better for the Memphis School System. I guess I held a – I won’t say a leadership role, but the case that was filed in my name was major at that time in trying to better the education system for African-American students.

The place looks very different now as I walked in here today. Quite different. I guess the Northcross versus the Board of Education did make a difference visually. It did anyway.

Chris Williams:

Oh boy. I think you might be right.

Deborah Northcross:

I’d have to talk to the students to see if it did otherwise.

Chris Williams:

Harder to change hearts in laws.

Deborah Northcross:

Absolutely.

Chris Williams:

How old were you when your family was involved in the case against the Board of Education?

Deborah Northcross:

I was 10 years old, 9 or 10 years old. The case was filed 1961 and I believe – it would make me 10 years old. I came here in 1966. That was a few years after the Brown case, so Memphis was not acting with all deliberate speed to desegregate the school system here. That’s why the case was filed. It still took a while for full integration to take place within the school system in Memphis.

Chris Williams:

Yes. Sounds like it did. Years, several years after.

Deborah Northcross:

Several. Mm-hm.

Chris Williams:

But then again, we’re just dealing with laws and not hearts at that point.

Deborah Northcross:

Yes. I guess I still have a hope that Memphis – there’s still a lot of racial issues in Memphis and I hope that we will, at a point in Memphis, see the value of races and appreciate races a bit more so we can enjoy the differences, value the differences.

Chris Williams:

I agree. I think for too many people in our city and around the world, it’s not just an issue of what color do we see or not see. Some will say they’re color blind. I’m sure they’re probably not in every way. It’s not the color, it’s the culture and it’s the appreciation of how somebody else does holidays. It’s an appreciation of how somebody else throws a birthday party. It’s the appreciation of how somebody else decorates the inside of their living room or their den.

Deborah Northcross:

Right.

Chris Williams:

It’s appreciation of the spices they use at the barbecue in the backyard. It’s the appreciation of a different way of saying the same word, things that make us a community and make us like each other but also add so much beauty to a conversation in a party, in a neighborhood, in a city and I think we do have a long way to go.

Deborah Northcross:

We do.

Chris Williams:

I’m so glad you started a lot of things rolling along the group of yours ago, but really not that long ago. It’s amazing how recent that is.

Deborah Northcross:

It seems like it to me as well. It also seems like we still have a long way to go.

Chris Williams:

We do.

Deborah Northcross:

Mm-hm. I hear the term race blind a lot and I don’t like that term, being race blind because it connotes to me that we don’t value each other’s race or ethnicity. I think we can be race tolerate, which I don’t think we are in Memphis – enough.

Chris Williams:

Correct. Or even race appreciative. I don’t want to be color blind or race blind because I really like the way people do things. There’s some better ways to do a lot of things. Just literally in my family, there’s some African-American families, there’s some Hispanic families and some Asian families and the 20-something nationalities of the public school that our family attends, it’s fantastic. Wow. I think the racial diversity here at Central High is probably that diverse at this point. If you really get into it, it’s really amazing.

Deborah Northcross:

If everybody was the same, it would be so boring, so dull.

Chris Williams:

It really would be. What was it like walking in here day 1? You might have changed the law, but I’m assuming some people were threatening and maybe a little media outside? I have no idea. I’m just trying to see what was it like walking from your car to the door?

Deborah Northcross:

I was a bit nervous. I remember walking up the sidesteps and someone, a teacher says something to me and I just responded “Huh?” because I didn’t hear what she said. She says “We don’t say huh here”. I said, oh boy here we go. First day.

Chris Williams:

Wow.

Deborah Northcross :

I was not the only African-American student who walked through the doors the first day. I can’t remember how many there were, but there were an excess of 15 or 20, so I was not here alone. We sought out each other clearly, but there was a lot of tension. It was a wait and see what the white students were going to do to us and what the black students were going to do to them. It was just a wait and see atmosphere. The classes, the teachers were – I didn’t have a problem with the teachers. My homeroom teacher, Ms. Opel Smith, did tell me though after a year that I was here that though I had made the grades, I was not going to be admitted into the national honor society.

Chris Williams:

My goodness. Really?

Deborah Northcross:

Yes.

Chris Williams:

Wow. Purely based on race?

Deborah Northcross:

Yes.

Chris Williams:

Wow.

Deborah Northcross:

So, I was glad to know that I was smart enough to be in it though. But I was not going to be admitted.

Chris Williams:

Wow. I think you’re smarter than your teacher at that point.

Deborah Northcross:

The bottom line for me though, I did make friends, there were very few incidences, fights or just brawls, very few of those here. I did make friends. I just still regret the fact that I never went to a prom. I guess that’s just a girl thing. I got a great education, I learned to write really well here. I learned to appreciate English literature here and I hate that I cannot remember my English literature teacher’s name. My favorite book today that I read here was The Tale of Two Cities. I would never forget it. It was an experience. It was character building, to say the least.

Chris Williams:

You had obviously a lot of opportunity to get down and bitter, angry, hurt, depressed, all those sorts of things that come from an average day walking in a hard situation that many people had gone through in many different ways. What kept you from turning out that way? There are a lot of people on any side of the race conversation. All of them were hurt and bitter and angry. What keeps it from happening to you?

Deborah Northcross:

My parents kept telling me you’re there to get an education. Remember why you’re there and I also remember that my parents were getting threats and they if they could take it, I could take it. I know that the suit was filed in my father’s name or my family’s name because he was an entrepreneur. He was a dentist. He could not be fired by a company.

Chris Williams:

Good point. Right.

Deborah Northcross:

So, he took the stance, he said okay I’ll let the NAACP use my name in filing this suit. He was brave enough to do that. If he could do that, I could stand up and walk these halls every day and take whatever came my way.

Chris Williams:

Wow. It comes from good stock which I know, your family.

Deborah Northcross:

They were pretty cool.

Chris Williams:

I think they were.

Deborah Northcross:

Yes.

Chris Williams:

Impressive.

Question 4: So, Deborah the next question is how are you sharing hope today?

You have created a lot of hope in your own heart, and your family’s given you a lot of hope in your heart. Your teachers have given you a lot of hope. You’ve got a phenomenal story and you’ve proven that it works and it lasts and you can hang on to it. So, how are you passing that along in your life today?

Deborah Northcross:

In my two or three jobs that I’ve had over the last 40 years, they’ve been working with what the department of education calls “disadvantaged students”. I’ve been providing them hope, working with them to support them in their educational pursuits. I’ve administered a couple of programs that really support services programs for them, but the students that I work with are first generation college low-income or disabled students. The purpose of those programs are to support them in their high school or college education and the last program I work with was to help them in their Ph.D. pursuit. It’s all about education for me.

Chris Williams:

I like that. It does come back.

Deborah Northcross:

It does and just to hear them come back to me and say how I’ve helped them… I had a call from a former student the other day. She’s in New York. She’s delayed going to graduate school, but she now is ready to apply at a graduate school to get her Ph.D. and she wants a recommendation. She wants me to help her, so I’m ready to help her.

Chris Williams:

Absolutely. That’s a really good, practical way to use your professional and personal background in a really hands-on way to change the lives you can name. You can name who you’ve touched, you know?

Deborah Northcross:

Yes. The job I have now, I’m no longer working directly with students, but I’m working with the staff who work with those type of students. I’m doing training workshops to train the staff who work with those students.

Chris Williams:

Wonderful. I don’t think most of us realize that our daily jobs, if that’s working behind a piece of equipment or if it’s work in the medical office or as a teacher, working in the home taking care of kids or working in a place that overseas even, another country, I don’t think we realize how much those daily tasks and daily relationships and daily encounters with the same people, same co-worker, same student, same patient, same child, whatever maybe, those are all opportunities to share hope. Because of the 2-year-old who skinned her knee, or if it’s an 18-year-old who is learning how to read, either one, they need hope.

Deborah Northcross:

Yes. Just a little encouragement, just a positive or a just a small thing can give somebody hope.

Chris Williams:

And it can take your mind off your own troubles.

Deborah Northcross:

Mm-hm.

Chris Williams:

Thinking about somebody else’s instead of yours.

Question 5: Number five down there from the question standpoint is, the a, b, c’s, the 1, 2, 3s, how can we walk away from this conversation and how can we learn some really practical ways to use hope in our own lives or in the lives right around us?

There’s a lot of people listening and a lot of people that may have come from a hard relationship or maybe an illness. It could be a financial crisis or chemical addiction, whatever it may be, what do we do next?

Deborah Northcross:

You and I were just saying, just give a little encouragement to somebody every day. A positive word, a hug, a pat on the back, say something positive to somebody. A little advice to somebody.

Chris Williams:

Deborah, do you ever have those days when you feel like you just can’t give somebody a hug or give them a pat in the back because you’re just so desperately in need of one yourself? How do you work past that in your own head when there’s nobody around you to pat you on the back some days?

Deborah Northcross:

No. I haven’t had that day. There are some days that I have not been around people. Some days I don’t come out of the house, but I’ve talked to people on the phone and I can give them a word of encouragement or just a – how was your conduct today? What have you done positive or how can I help you today?

Chris Williams:

You’re going to go out of your way to make sure that you don’t let a feeling that you’re having for a moment or a day or a month change the course of your life?

Deborah Northcross:

Well, I’m going to try not to, Chris.

Chris Williams:

That’s great.

Deborah Northcross:

You know, I have been really blessed, I think, that I have not had real tragedy in my life and I won’t say that the death of my parents – that was tragic for me, but you move on. Something like losing a house in a fire or just a catastrophic or terminal illness or something that can just really devastate you, I have not had that and I’m not wishing for it. But, I see people around me who have just been devastated by life’s circumstances and that may come to me one day. At that point, I guess I’m going to have to pull on some real hope. I’m going to need a pat on the back or a word of encouragement. I guess that’s why I say I’m blessed because I have not had that experience yet. If I have had that experience and I don’t know it, then I’m really blessed. I really am. I guess I’m waiting for the shoe to fall or I’m a really strong person in that I have not recognized the really, really bad days in my life. It’s just very interesting.

Chris Williams:

It is interesting. I’ve learned through these interviews, Deborah, that there seems to be some people who’ve had those hard times and they’ve had to come back from nothing and rebuild their hope and their minds and their lives and their relationships and everything.

Deborah Northcross:

That’s what I’m talking about. Not having to come back from nothing.

Chris Williams:

I’ve heard the same level of hardship come from people like what you’re saying right now. A lot of people would say, what you’ve gone through should have left a scar on your heart that I would feel, as a white guy, every time you walk up to me that I would feel your pain or your frustrations towards me. But, some other people we’ve interviewed, it’s like they naturally don’t carry that stuff.

Deborah Northcross:

I would be mad every day then if I carried it like that.

Chris Williams:

I think that’s the key here because as a kid, going to basketball camp for instance, there were these college guys who teach us how to play basketball and some of those guys were just natural. They were genetically made to play basketball, but they could still teach me the steps and the processes. They’d probably be able to do it more naturally and quicker than I ever will, but they’re never the guys who had to work hard to get there and they were actually teaching the same steps and same processes. I think even though you carry it differently, you’re giving us still a clear line of sight because you’re simply not letting it soak in, in a way that it stays on you. Yes it happened and yes… Like the quote you started with us is a great one from Oprah, it is behind us and theirs. So much road ahead and you are the one who gets to choose what that road is going to look like. In some ways, people can’t choose that road, but in a lot of ways we can. Who knows, the hopeful people we’re talking to are still in very hard situations and it’s amazing what they’re doing.

Deborah Northcross:

You’re causing me to think why I don’t carry it. Maybe I carry it differently because if I carried it the way I think you would anticipate that I carry it, I would be a very angry person every day all day and I can’t live like that. I go back to the Ferguson mess or the pattern that I see of white policemen killing black males. That pisses me off because it seems to be a pattern.

Chris Williams:

Sure. It should make you mad.

Deborah Northcross :

It pisses me off, but…It’s not a but, it makes me very angry and I hope that the road ahead gets rid of the pattern. Something has got to be done about the pattern. There seems to be no justice and the fighting, the looting, the violence, all that is a demonstration of feelings of the unjust, feelings that it’s not a fix. It’s not a fix. That it is a demonstration that I hope people take heed to, but I’m angry still about it, about the pattern.

Chris Williams:

Yes. You should be. I think that’s honest. To say you weren’t wouldn’t be honest.

Deborah Northcross:

I’m afraid if the pattern is not undone, this country is going to explode. Hearts didn’t change.

Chris Williams:

Right.

Deborah Northcross:

Hearts still haven’t changed and some hearts won’t change and I know that. I know that. That’s why we’re seeing the pattern that we’re seeing today.

Chris Williams:

Deborah, some hearts do.

Deborah Northcross:

Some do. Absolutely.

Chris Williams:

Yours and mine and we have some great friends here in town. We know that. Why is it that they are able to change? Why is it that you and I are able to make a choice and get past something that’s caused us so much pain? I’m not sure I’m past some of the pain in my life, but I’m…

Deborah Northcross:

That’s a very good question. Why are some hearts unable to change? Because of experiences. Because of experiences. Would you say that you have experiences with different cultures, peoples as opposed to one whose heart has not changed?

Chris Williams:

I’d say that my experiences of people and other cultures obviously, honestly are mixed back. We’d have to say that there are people acting outside of my control that some of those things made me smile, some made me frown. I have to be honest about that like you’re being honest about that. But if I want to return the favor to the one that makes me smile, then I need to smile back in some activity. If I want to make the angry person across from me at some point more angry, I just reply with anger. If I don’t want to do that and I don’t want to do that, then I try to reply with love and with graciousness and with a realization that whatever culture they’re from – I mean there’s so many cultures in Memphis. Whatever culture they’re from, there’s something about me that is triggering something in them that relates to their past. Somebody like me has caused them harm and it’s not my fault and honestly at that point it’s probably not their fault. Maybe I can give them one reason to think maybe some of the people like that, whatever that is, maybe they’re different. I’m sure there’s things that I do that I don’t even realize that offend somebody from another culture. I want to be aware and I want to be acting in love and I want to be showing people that there is a better way to do things. Not better than their way, just there’s a better way for all of us.

Deborah Northcross:

It is about changing the heart and I guess the difference is our experiences with other people or what we’d learned from parents about other people. I would say a child who has no experience with someone can learn something from his or her parent.

Chris Williams:

Yes.

Deborah Northcross:

It’s just passed down, you’re not supposed to like this person or this culture. That is just ignorant.

Chris Williams:

It is ignorant. Unfortunately, the parent may not know any better maybe because they’re taught that and their parents taught that and on it goes.

Deborah Northcross:

Exactly.

Chris Williams:

If you’re listening to this or if you’re reading or learning or thinking and changing a little bit, just start changing a little bit more and I have a long way to go and each of us do, but a little bit more is a step. That is the next step and it picks up on itself.

Deborah, you’ve been tremendous telling us things about your life and your past and giving us a window into a part of the history that’s easy to forget about or easy just to see news reels of in black and white, but not really connect to what happened to real people.

Deborah Northcross:

It’s been an adventure.

Chris Williams:

You’ve also been a great encouragement to show us that it doesn’t have to end in pain and anguish and sorrow for you and you’re the only one who gets to decide what goes one in your head.

Deborah Northcross:

Because there’s a road ahead.

Chris Williams:

Yes there is.

Deborah Northcross :

I don’t know what it is, but there is a road ahead.

Chris Williams:

There is. There was 40 years ago and there was 20 years to go in there and there was yesterday and probably will be tomorrow.

Deborah Northcross:

Hopefully.

Chris Williams:

Yes. I could work that. Deborah, as we wrap this up, how can people find you? Is there a Facebook, a Twitter? Any social media sites out there that you’re willing to share publicly that people could be part of your story or conversation or reach out to you in some way?

Deborah Northcross:

I have not entered this century in social media.

Chris Williams:

That’s good. You’re one of the lucky few.

Deborah Northcross:

I do have email, but I am not on Twitter, Facebook or anything of a social media nature.

Chris Williams:

How about this? A good way to handle this is in the show notes of this podcast, we will make sure there’s a connection and get Deborah connected to those show notes. There’s a lot of comment sections there, some more info and history about Deborah, a picture of her and a little more about her story. If you have any questions for her, we’ll make sure she is connected and she can reply and stay in contact.

Deborah Northcross:

That sounds great. Very willing to do that.

Chris Williams:

Great. Deborah, thank you very much. On the way out, I ask everybody the same question. Is there a song, an artist, whatever it is you pop in the CD player, MP3 player when you’re driving around if you want to make the day a little sunnier? What do you listen to?

Deborah Northcross:

I like the Pharrell Williams song Happy.

Chris Williams:

Yes. No kidding?

Deborah Northcross:

I do. Is that the name of it?

Chris Williams:

Yes. It is the Happy song.

Deborah Northcross:

Yes, I do.

Chris Williams:

My kids love that too. That’s a great song. It does make you smile, don’t it.

Deborah Northcross:

It does. You know what, that song just went around the world. There were other cultures in other countries doing videos from that song and it just made me happy to see them do that. It just caught on and that was hopeful. It was very hopeful.

Chris Williams:

I love it. Deborah thanks so much for you time.

Deborah Northcross:

Thank you Chris.

Chris Williams:

Debbie Dodson is the librarian here and she just walked up with a yearbook from – let’s see what we got here.

Deborah Northcross:

Debbie, I don’t know.

Chris Williams:

A yearbook from the Warriors 1969.

Deborah Northcross:

Looking for that English teacher. She was the best. There was a husband and wife team. He taught Chemistry and she taught English, Ms. Meeks. That’s her. She made me love The Tale of Two Cities, Ms. Meeks.

Chris Williams:

Wow. The bell sounds different than it used to.

Deborah Northcross:

That’s the bell?

Chris Williams:

That’s the bell.

Deborah Northcross:

Gee. We made alcohol in Chemistry class. We made moonshine.

You’ve just listened to I Share Hope. If you’re ready to make a change, head to our website at isharehope.com and claim your free copy of the Top Ten Actions of Hope from World Leaders to use hope in your own life. Thanks for listening and we’ll talk to you next time.

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My mom thinks I’m a champion. She thinks I can do all things better than anyone else. Sometimes she’s so persistent that I actually start believing that I can be one - a champion. As I grew older…Read More

On I Share Hope’s site you can read and listen to motivational podcast interviews with leaders from many walks of life. We reach out to people who are leaders in their fields to see what they can te…Read More

I Share Hope is a website, a community if you will, of people who give and receive motivation amongst each other. Through a series of motivation podcasts we hope to inspire people around the world to …Read More

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